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Côté Soleil in Sunnyside Closes, Owner to Focus on French Bistro on 31st Avenue

The owner of Côté Soleil has closed his Sunnyside restaurant and will focus on his French bistro located on the border of Jackson Heights and East Elmhurst (Photo: Nathaly Pesantez)

July 8, 2020 By Christian Murray

A popular French restaurant located on Skillman Avenue has closed.

Vincent Caro, who established Côté Soleil in 2016, posted a message on Instagram Tuesday announcing that he had closed the 50-12 Skillman Ave. venue for good.

“We are proud to have provided high-quality food and been an enthusiastic part of the local community for several years now,” Caro wrote. “But because of the recent challenges we face during the COVID-19 pandemic, the restaurant will close.”

The closure of Côté Soleil, which means sunny side in French, does not mark the end of Caro in the restaurant business. He owns a French bistro located on the border of Jackson Heights and East Elmhurst that will continue to operate.

This venue—named Bistro Eloise (after Caro’s daughter)—opened at 75-57 31st Ave. a little under two years ago.

“We have the same staff, the same ambiance and good food, a full liquor license and an exclusive terrace where you’ll always be warmly welcomed,” Caro said, adding that the establishment delivers to Sunnyside and Woodside among other neighborhoods.

Caro, who grew up in Brittany in the northwest of France, thanked residents for their support over the years and also noted that he is not necessarily leaving Sunnyside for good.

“We are not giving up on the neighborhood and when circumstances are favorable, a new and improved version of Côté Soleil shall be back in the area.”

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13 Comments

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Carbie Barbie

It was a really good place but now, for the love of god, can we get a good bagel joint in the neighborhood?

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#wheresjimmy

There will be more closures
And I’m told that although se to open many of the salons not getting customers as media screams we are going to die !
Many of the owners are immigrant women

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That storefront has always had a very hard time.

First it was a pizza place, then an overpriced but upscale hardware store, then another pizza place, then this. I think it’s just too small for an actual sit down eatery.

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Mac

That storefront was Rosario Pizza for many many years. The people from Uncle Jimmy’s were going to move in but there were issues. Another pizza place moved in and closed then the French Restaurant moved in and had good food and was quite popular. Sorry to see them close.

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MJ Drage

As other pointed out the Hardware store, which was NOT overpriced, was next door where the Tai kwon do (sp?) place is now located. It was Rosarrio’s forever. Then a short lived pizza place. Then Cote.

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Gardens Watcher

Very sad to hear. An outstanding restaurant with exceptional food and a gracious, friendly host. Their delivery is quick, which is the only way I’ll be dining “out” for the foreseeable future.

These are very difficult times for all restaurants. I wish you all the best and hope to return in better days.

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