You are reading

Queens Undergoes a Spike in Suicides as COVID-19 Crisis Rolls On

(Luca Bravo Unsplash)

April 29, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

Suicides in Queens have soared since COVID-19 broke out.

The rate has doubled in the past six weeks compared to the same period in 2019, according to the Queens District Attorney’s office.

The alarming numbers come at a time when Queens is being hit hard by the virus. The borough has experienced more COVID-19 confirmed deaths than any other in the city.

There were 16 reported suicides in Queens County between March 15 and April 28, the data shows. By comparison, there were eight suicides in Queens County for the same period last year – March 15, 2019 – April 28, 2019.

The figures indicate that COVID-19 – which has killed as many as 5,000 borough residents – is also having an emotional impact on the World’s Borough.

“There is a mental health component to this health crisis that needs our attention,” Queens District Attorney’s Melinda Katz said in a statement.

“Since this pandemic began the numbers of suicides in Queens County have soared, she said.

The statewide economic shutdown began on March 22 but restrictions on mass gathering had gone into effect in the city earlier. Mayor de Blasio shuttered bars and restaurants on March 17, except for takeout and delivery. Schools closed on March 16.

Katz said that nobody is immune from the emotional distress of the virus and called on residents to look out for one another.

“Check in on each other because nobody should be alone in this and there is absolutely no shame in reaching out for help.”

email the author: [email protected]

7 Comments

Click for Comments 
#dumpdeblasio

People are losing their jobs and being told that their jobs are “non essential” and to stay home. Of course, people are depressed! And then there is the increase in domestic violence . . .

14
Reply
Debra

I am sure once they close streets to cars and open them to pedestrians people will feel much better. They should also rush to open up hair and nail salons. Those hair dressers and nail professionals always make me feel better about myself.

11
16
Reply
It's not that suicidal thoughts are a side effect...

But about how anti-depressents remove the fear of botching the suicide attempt. It removes the fear so as soon as something happens to you that sends you over the edge, you feel confident enough that you will succeed in committing suicide. This best to closely monitor the patient. CLOSELY.

4
1
Reply
Grace

Other than healthcare workers no one else is making dance and song videos around here. Queens is a very depressing place. Unless you’re walking around in a box of plexiglass you are at risk of getting sick. Everyone is so afraid of being taken to Elmhurst. 😷

8
1
Reply
Jk

I hope they are testing for coronavirus during the autopsy. The virus can compromise brain function.

5
3
Reply
Lemon Virus King of Corona

How many were on anti-depressants? You know the ones where the TV ads tell you right out that suicidal thoughts could be a side effect.

10
1
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.

LaGuardia Community College President Kenneth Adams explained that the school lost nearly a quarter of its students at the height of the pandemic due to the economic effects of the lockdown on low-income Queens households.

BP launches new advisory panel for youth to become civically engaged in the future of Queens

In an effort to get more young people involved in civics, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards has created a new advisory panel known as the Youth and Young Adult Council to introduce the “youngest and fiercest” community advocates to both community service and organization.

Members of the advisory body will advocate concerns through means of community engagement by participating in one of two cohorts. The first will be made up of high school representatives between the ages of 13 and 17, while the second cohort will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 18 and 25.

Raga sworn in as first-ever Filipino American elected to the state Legislature

More than 300 community members attended the historic inauguration of Assemblyman Steven Raga as the first Filipino American elected to office in New York state.

Many who attended the swearing-in event at the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows Corona Park wore traditional and cultural attire to the event at the building that once housed the General Assembly of the newly formed United Nations from 1946-50 until its current home in Manhattan became available for the world body.