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Queens DOT Commissioner Says Bike Boulevard is a ‘Work in Progress’ and Asks for Patience

The DOT was criticized Thursday for the way it rolled out its 39th Avenue Bike Boulevard plan, which is still in the process of being completed (Photo by Michael Dorgan, Queens Post))

Oct. 8, 2021 By Christian Murray

The Queens Commissioner of the Department of Transportation told residents during a Community Board 2 meeting Thursday that the controversial 39th Avenue Bike Boulevard remains “a work in progress” and asked for “patience.”

“This is a creative, innovative treatment–the first of its kind in the borough,” said Queens DOT Commissioner Nicole Garcia at the meeting, which was held via Zoom.  “What we are asking for is a little bit of patience. We know there is a little bit of confusion.”

Garcia said the plan has yet to be fully implemented and that many changes such as new signage and pedestrian ramps have yet to be installed. She said the DOT is working as quickly as possible to get the project done and that people should wait for it to be completed before coming to a final conclusion.

Garcia said she joined the meeting to get feedback from board members and the public.

“Once construction is complete, we are happy to do walk-throughs and figure out what we can tweak– to make a good project even better,” Garcia said. “The DOT has already been hearing about the benefits of the plan, such as how it is reducing the amount of through traffic and making it safer for the residents on the block.”

The 45th Street intersection at Barnett Avenue during the early stages of construction (Photo by Michael Dorgan, Queens Post)

Construction began at the end of September and the plan has seen various portions of 39th Avenue and Barnett Avenue—that were previously two-way roadways—converted into one-way zones. The change has created space for a protected bicycle lane and pedestrian safety features.

The plan, however, got a mixed reception from the board Thursday, with some praising the DOT for  creating a bike boulevard in the district—while others said the plan has led to confusion.

Lisa Deller, chair of Community Board 2 and a Sunnyside Gardens resident, said the DOT did a poor job in rolling out the plan.

“The implementation has really been so disruptive to the neighborhood…DOT has to do better on projects like this,” she said.

She said the DOT should have had staff on the ground talking to residents to explain the changes when construction began. She said many residents were caught by surprise and “the confusion and disruption for people in the neighborhood has been so extreme.”

Thomas Mituzas, a board member and co-chair of the Transportation Committee, also questioned the DOT on its rollout.

“I would think that if the DOT thought that this was an important project we would have seen more people on the ground talking to the neighborhood and being involved and I did not see that,” Mituzas said.

But the actual plan was praised by many board members.

Amparo Abel-Bey, a board member and a 39th Avenue resident, complimented the DOT for the plan.

“I want to thank you for this project,” Abel-Bey said.

Laura Shepard, a board member who is also a volunteer with Transportation Alternatives Queens, said: “We are thrilled to have Queens’ first bike boulevard. I know this is a change and an adjustment…but already you are seeing some of the benefits. We don’t have drivers using it as a cut through, speeding is down. We are loving the new crosswalks and seeing all sorts of people bicycling…so thank you for this.”

But many residents who spoke during the public comment period were less complimentary, with some calling for the plan to be reversed. More than 40 signed up to speak but many were unable to participate.

Community Board 2 had capped the maximum number of participants on Zoom to 100. With 50 board members and various officials, the number of spots left for the public to get on the call was limited.

One resident complained in the Zoom chat room.

“This meeting was capped at 100 and it took me one hour to be admitted,” wrote resident Amanda Lefer.

Deller said the cap was an oversight and that the board didn’t anticipate so many people would want to partake in the meeting. She said the cap would be increased at future meetings.

The opponents of the plan—and there were many—were blunt in their assessment of it.

“I think the design is terrible. The result has been chaos. It has not calmed traffic,” said Gerald Perrin, a lifelong Phipps Garden Apartments resident.

He said that he now has to drive several additional blocks in order to get to his apartment. He also said that 39th Road near Phipps Garden Apartments has gone from a quiet narrow street to a busy through street. “39th Road is bedlam,” he said.

Debbie Farley, a Sunnyside resident, said the plan “is confusing at best. There is a lot of congestion.”

She wondered what was in store for residents when Phipps starts constructing its 167-unit apartment complex on Barnett Avenue and the city builds the 720-seat middle school at 38-04 48th St. “What will the effect be when trucks start coming in.”

“You are creating chaos and then say it is a work in progress,” Farley said.

Other speakers discussed how parking spaces had been lost and how some streets off 39th Avenue had become congested.  Some also argued that the bike boulevard had become more dangerous particularly for pedestrians—stating that e-bikes, mopeds and regular bicycles are speeding or going in the wrong direction.

But several Sunnyside residents spoke in favor of the proposal during the public comment period.

“I’ve been shocked to see the improvement in the quality of my life already…I am looking forward to the full implementation,” said Philip Leff, who lives on 39th Avenue.

Max Diamond, another resident, also praised the plan and said even in its partially constructed state it was an improvement.

Some speakers praised the plan for providing a safe bicycle connection to Jackson Heights. They said that the new bike boulevard had already made it safer for bicyclists—and less cars on the roadway is good for the environment.

But some speakers wanted to know why the DOT selected 39th Avenue for its first Queens bike boulevard in the first place—and what role the community played in that decision. They argued that the DOT was not being very transparent.

“The lack of data shared [by the DOT] has been concerning, “ said Chris Mitchell, a local resident.

“Looking back at the presentation at the community board [on June 23] there was no data provided regarding the selection of this area. I ask that the DOT make that information available to the community.”

He said the community needs to know what metrics are being collected and how the project is being evaluated in order to objectively look at its effectiveness.

“As you see from people testifying tonight, people’s bias shows through. Some people think everything has been fixed overnight and others think everything has gone to hell.”

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71 Comments

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Tom from Woodside

Explain how making me zigzag 5 or 6 extra blocks to get from where my car is garaged to one of the main thoroughfares (either Northern or Queens Boulevards) makes things safer? And furthermore… anyone who “claims” that 39th Avenue was unsafe before is just flat out lying thru their teeth. It was always a relatively quiet avenue as far as traffic was concerned. It only became “unsafe” when DiBlasio, the City Council, and DOT decided streets are for people and bikes, and then allowed them to totally disregard the rules for sharing the road.

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Nari

Actually, it’s much quieter and safer now. And no one cares that poor ol’ you have to drive a few extra blocks to your private garage. You should be thankful that you own a house, car, and garage instead of complaining.

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You can afford a private car and private parking?

I’m so sorry you have to drive around construction temporarily. Your life must be hard!

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Needs more direction

People are not even using the bike lane, but riding in a now one lane street which is very dangerous.

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Nari

39th Ave has already gotten nicer without as many cut through cars from outside the neighborhood. There are definitely issues with people not obeying the laws and signs, but this is coming from every type of vehicle. Not just bikes. And that isn’t a problem with the laws or signs, it’s a problem with people doing whatever they want. We need enforcement. I’d like to let the DOT do their job and see how this road improves.

As for those complaining about chaos, you don’t know the definition of chaos then. And please spare me the crying over how you have to drive a few extra blocks in your private car while the rest of us walk in the cold, rain, and wind. Maybe you should count your lucky stars instead of complaining.

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Tom from Woodside

Explain how making me zigzag 5 or 6 extra blocks to get from where my car is garaged to one of the main thoroughfares (either Northern or Queens Boulevards) makes things safer? And furthermore… anyone who “claims” that 39th Avenue was unsafe before is just flat out lying thru their teeth. It was always a relatively quiet avenue as far as traffic was concerned. It only became “unsafe” when DiBlasio, the City Council, and DOT decided streets are for people and bikes, and then allowed them to totally disregard the rules for sharing the road.

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Nari

Another entitled car owner that thinks streets should only be for them. Guess what, the times they are a changing.

Maybe you would feel more at home in Long Island or NJ?

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robert jones

I have no objection to bike lanes because occasionally I ride a bike in Queens and Manhattan.But the level of disregard for the law; stop signs and red lights has made me fell angry that there is no law enforcement for bicycles,E-bikes and illegal dirt bikes.I have had several close calls on Skillman ave and in Manhattan where work and I feel the new bike lanes and one ways etc. is completely ludicrous

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James D

Hi, just want to point out 2 things (or 3):
1• Not every person who owns a bicycle can afford the $400 to equip their bike with the same level of DOT approved LED Lights, turn signals, and brake lights (as I have done on a few prototypes). Motorcycle riders are required to have headlights on in the daytime, LED equivalent of a 35 watt moped/scooter headlight would need a battery capacity beyond the reach of working people or students $$$.
2• Rear-View Mirrors were the subject of fierce debate in 1974, when automobiles received convex mirrors on their passenger side , but … the government isn’t going to subsidize the bicycle industry to retrofit bicycles built before 1974, and the first CONVEX (wide angle) rear view mirrors for bicycles appeared in 1994. People had to wait 20 years.
3• Video Cameras: Cyclists started carrying camcorders in 1991, and today they use GoPro, Polaroid, Sony, Vivitar, or the other brand. Usually the victim of a car bike crash doesn’t have a video to prove it wasn’t their fault. Again, those cameras cost $50 to $500 .

So the public needs bike lanes, just as they need sidewalks.

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Harold Bieber

Why are there signatures from people who live in Brooklyn on this petition? Shouldn’t it be from people who actually live near 39th Avenue? Will Sunnyside Post investigate this?

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What about Barnnett Ave?

Make Barnett the bike boulevard, it can use the beautification and is not a heavily used roadway and nothing but a dumping ground.

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Mike

The city has slid back on so many quality of life issues and congestion is one of them. The city has no plan, DeBlasio has had zero vision after he got Pre K passed and Adams is figuring out who in real estate to dole favors to.

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Ethan

Not a hard one to figure out. The locals apparently don’t want it. Not that it matters to the Dept of Transportation Alternatives.

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Kate

I drove “Bike Blvd” last night for the first time trying to get home after a 5 hours drive. I was floored at the stupidity of the project. One way street for one block, then two ways for a block, then go around a whole other block to get back to the same block….Who created this mess? I am fine with bike protection but this type of rollout is just a pathetic joke.

Also the implementation of these “Bike Blvds” come with absolutely no accountability to those riding the bikes. I have seen them run red lights, hit children or almost hit them when they are getting off the bus, weaving through traffic, cutting people off. If the city wants to make Bikes a primary mode of transportation then they need to enforce the rules of the rode on EVERYONE! This sad excuse that it takes a lot of work to register bikes….maybe that should have been the FIRST STEP in creating a bike friendly city instead of wasting funds on these ridiculous bike lanes. I support bike lanes in main areas like Queens Blvd, Northern Blvd and others that are well thought out and implemented in a manner that makes sense to the ENTIRE COMMUNITY.

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Rich Campaign Donor

Kate, please stand for city council, DOT, or whatever organization was in charge of this specific bike lane. You will be elected. I can guarantee it. You will not see many of us support you in person, cause we are kinda lazy. But, Im sure we can give some monies. Im down for like $5-10. So if we can get sunny-side commenters in Im sure we can whip up like 10k$ for you to make some noise and get this bike lane down. Alternatively you can get rent out an angle grinder and a few paint brushes from home depot, and we can have this back to normal in a day. Evidently the road detours to home depot I believe, so it shouldn’t take to long. As the saying goes you can do it we can help.

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Tom from Woodside

It’s not too late to undo this travesty. What the DOT has done to this small stretch of 39th Avenue does nothing to “calm” traffic or make things “safer” for bicyclists or pedestrians. And it great inconveniences the people who actually live in this stretch of Sunnyside who can’t get to or from their homes by car without taking a zigzag route through their neighborhood.

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Guest

Most people in NYC don’t drive, and of those who do most of them drive a few times a week (not commuting with it). The future of this city is more in the way of walking, public transit, bicycling, and small micro mobility electric vehicles.

This is a step in the right direction, but it is Queens where a lot of people are really backwards when it comes to transportation. The cars aren’t working to move the people of NYC, it’s long been time to try something else.

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Local Feminist

Guest, well your argument really strokes a cord with me when you mention the people of Queens are really backwards. As an early 20 something living here, I can tell you that your comment is you spitting in the faces of people who grew up here, or have been living here. Your name says it all you are a guest, this is our culture, and our way of life. I use a car, cause I need to transport heavy items for work. Or it may be more economical for people, or help save time so Jony’s Dad can come see his kids at home much quicker. or maybe I gotta buy a load of stuff from costco. Living in the world we all got a freedom of choice.

Anyways guest, all I am saying is if you on a bike, watch out for my car.

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Dan diddly

The amount of raging boomers who downvoted your comment is insane.

Fortunately, times are changing and a newer generation of more progressive, climate oriented, less selfish individuals is taking control of our city’s future. This 75 year old is happy to see it!

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Anonymous

Ridiculous. For a few bikes tons of $ was spent. The $ could have been used for more beneficial social services. This area is not a major through-fare for bikes, a normal bike lane would have been optimal. This is something u see off of the Queens Bridge, the Brooklyn Bridge, or other busy biking area.

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The Cyclist

Let’s be honest, most of us are not involved with this community for these type of transport related stuff. Once these changes get announced we only know what happened after these changes take place, or maybe some article comes up on the Sunnyside Post to alert us to whats going down. This was obviously a bad move…as seen by the overwhelming backlash this thing has gotten. I mean look at this dislike ratios on the pro-bike comments, compared to the pro-car comments.

Frankly we need to elect someone to represent the people who use cars; as much of the people in charge of these decisions are pro bike. I understand you cyclist want your bike lanes and stuff, I have no issue, but I would like to be represented as motorist is all that I am trying to say. #CarsToo #ParkingForCars #JusticeForCars

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Annie

Thank you DOT for calling for patience. There already has been a pretty easily measurable improvement: peace and quiet! It’s like every day is Sunday and our community truly is a small town in the big city. What a welcome change!

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jerry collins

Back to the status quo ante . . please. There was nothing wrong with the way it was before all this re-design took place. It actually was much more quiet. I live in the neighborhood and own 5 – FIVE – bicycles and one car. Trust me.

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Tracy Sullivan

As Gretha, a DOT rep stated at the CB2 Transportation meeting stated, “This is a mayoral initiative.” The mayor and his puppets could care less about the people of this community’s. There are protected bike lanes on 43rd Ave., Skillman Ave. Queens Blvd and Northern Blvd. Cyclists already had a safe way to travel to Manhattan, as was claimed was one of the goals of the bike Blvd. What about the safety of the residents of the community? Was the FDNY consulted on how these absurd changes will effect response times? Probably not, remember it’s a mayoral initiative; they would be stifled because they are city employees. This was done in a heavy handed manner with absolutely NO regard for the people that actually LIVE in the community.

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Let's Go Brandon!

This plan makes total sense when you realize the future planned for us by the Global Elites where only the very rich and politically connected will own an automobile. That’s the trajectory we are on. Adios Middle Class and the modern conveniences you once could afford.

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Henry Ford Musk

I agree, with all these detours I gotta make for my home depot runs, I’ll be left carrying 4×8 drywall sheets on bicycle in the near future. I’ll also be needing a horse and buggy now to go to Long Island, so I will only be seeing my dearest over a fortnight instead of 40 min in i495.

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Steve

Whatever makes food delivery faster is great for our community. It helps feed people faster and also helps business keep up with the demand. Its getting too cold to eat outside. And not all restaurants are checking vaccination proof for indoor dining. Be patient!

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Eliana

I do not bike ride or drive a car. But i am willing to be patient. I learned to look both ways before crossing the street at least 3 times and also managed to speed walk while waving my hand in the air to cross the street.

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Alibaster

It’s important to clarify that the Zoom license has always allowed a max of 100 people and this has never been a problem before but the Board stated they will upgrade to a new license allowing more attendees. Also, as the District Manager pointed out in the meeting, there have been meeting in-person at Sunnyside Community Services that had to turn away attendees due to maximum number of people allowed in that building.

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Rose Sullivan

I disagree that the community is “FULL” of cyclists. If that’s the case then the community is also “FULL” of non-cyclists. And stop saying we’re privileged. What are you even trying to say when you make that comment. Many opponents to this plan have lived here all their lives, are hard working and pay rent and mortgages and outrageous property taxes like any other community. The fact that they maintain their property and property values have increased over the decades shouldn’t be cause for assumptions of “privilege”. Sunnyside is a lovely community because the long time residents have worked very hard to keep it so. Having cyclists, e-bikes, scooters passing through our neighborhood from other communities is not something we asked for, nor do we welcome it. There are bike lanes on skillman and 43rd ave and parts of queens and northern blvds. Causing the chaos on 39th Ave. was not well thought out at best, and the implementation is far from safe.

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RBG

Your privilege is that you were born into a world built for cars and when people demand equality, you work to deny it. Many more people walk and ride bikes and scooters than own cars. We are also one neighborhood in a city of millions and our roads belong to all citizens, not just the ones who have found themselves here.

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James Pan

Interesting that there was no thought given to senior citizens and handicapped people. Many of us are very dependent on our cars. We already lost parking due the bike lanes on 43rd & Skillman Avenues. The DOT encouraged the use of e-bikes and motorized scooters. Yet, they shift the responsibility for enforcement of road rules on to the over taxed NYPD. ” ZERO” vision!!!

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B- Clear

Just seems with all the technology we have in the 21st Century, there would be a better, safer and less chaotic way to evaluate if this new configuration is actually viable vs. turning humans into living Chess pieces and spending tax payer money on something that may likely be modified.

On a regular basis, I’ve seen drivers of trucks, cars, e-bikes, scooters and bicyclists disobeying all of the new signage at 50th Street. It really is much more dangerous for Pedestrians with everything coming from all directions.

Traffic jams are a regular occurrence, especially when school buses are picking up/dropping off passengers because all moving vehicles have to stop in place.

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Capt. Mitchell of the Wailing Manatee

Truthfully, Diane, it doesn’t ever end. There will always be an imbalance of power. The power has for the last decades belonged to automobile drivers, but now there are enough people who want our roads to be used for pedestrians, cyclists, and children, that the power is being shared. There is much more work to do. You can visit the websites of Families For Safe Streets and Transportation Alternatives to find out what work must still be done in the years to come.

When roads are safe for all users, and when transportation is easy and accessible for all users, and the roads reflect the needs of all and the needs of the planet, will the work be done.

I hope you help us, Diane.

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Anonymous

I guess children and elders abroad are super-humans, and they can pedal places with relative ease because the routes are safer. And folks around here are just less capable of non-motorized mobility. These people aren’t speaking for elders, they’re speaking for this car-dependent selves.

Let’s just completely own that “data,” first of all.

Or maybe some around here see the benefits of bringing a good old fashioned trolley to the market that is 3 blocks away instead of driving to Food Bazaar twice a week like this is gd Ronkonkama.

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Datricia

These anti-bike lane and anti-street safety philistines lost all remaining credibility when one of them threatened ONCE AGAIN to place thumbtacks in area bike lanes.

Oh, and don’t forget the CB2 member who demanded a public commenter reveal personal information.

The folks who are trying to prevent this life-saving project from happening are going way outside the bounds of civility. It is terrifying.

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It's hard to save lives

When things are so confusing and detrimental to society. No one asked the voters and the people living here if this is something we’d like it think was a good idea.

At the end of the day it’s up to the everyone to look both ways and make good choices.

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Randy Quaid

The voters absolutely were asked. We voted for candidates who advocated for these measures, including our Congressperson Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, she of the Green New Deal. Maybe the loud voices at sunnysidepost.com don’t believe in building a better world for all, but the voters of the community do.

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The Cyclist

Datricia to be quite frank, your comment comes off to put quite nicely…abrasive. Let’s be honest, I don’t think anyone has the time to lay down thumbtacks on the bike lane. Your whole demeanor of labeling anti-bikers as someone preventing what you deem as a life saving project a little over exaggerated. As a resident of the neighborhood, I have not witnessed frequent deaths happening in this area prior. So relax a little bit, as a pro-motorist, I think we just feel under represented. We have valid reasons to be against this. To see this in such a one dimensional view is quite an oversight. People use vehicles for many things that bikes cannot do.

Datricia I ask you to imagine coming home from a long day at work and now instead of entering your home through your door, you now have to enter it through a 2-story back window.

Thanks,

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Ryan Cauley

As usual the Sunnyside post comments section and the community board comments have become brigaded by the usual flock of busybodies with nothing better to do but to attempt to continue to depress the quality of life of the rest of the residents of the community.

Contrary to the constant whining you may hear, the majority of residents in Sunnyside actually support bike lanes and street safety improvements such as this one. Please don’t lend credence to a couple of Luddite loudmouths who if they were alive 100 years ago would complain that the proliferation of electric street lamps was a blight on the “character of the neighborhood”. It’s time to move on and be a progressive neighborhood.

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mac

Ryan, you sound like you just moved here. I was born and bred here in Sunnyside. You have no idea what you’re talking about. Cars speed down 39th ave, and treat the barriers like a slalom course now…..

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Jack N. Coke

Mac, read the article again. DOT knows drivers are incredibly dangerous in their illegality, but this project is still being constructed.

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Not Ryan, I'm Ryan Reynolds Cousin

“flock of busybodies with nothing better to do but to attempt to continue to depress the quality of life of the rest of the residents of the community.”

Ryan I think you have been smelling too much of your own farts lately. Do you not see not everyone shares the same views as you. Just because we don’t want a dam bike lane doesn’t make people malicious baby killer all of a sudden. Understand, not everyone is on the same spectrum. Im not completely anti-bike lanes, as much as I hate cyclist with a passion.

As fellow commenter quite eloquently put
” I was floored at the stupidity of the project. One way street for one block, then two ways for a block, then go around a whole other block to get back to the same block….Who created this mess?” This from someone who also supports bike lanes.

It baffles me when these types of projects get passed, because it’s labeled as good for the community. In there heads I think there logic is bikes are good, and therefore adding bike lanes is also good. But, if that was the case i think we should add another bike lane to the first 200 feet of the queens midtown tunnel maybe and that will curb neighborhood deaths. Don’t you think that would be a great idea Ryan?

Understand the world needs a balance to work in harmony with bikes, cars, people, and whatever comes out next. As much as each folk may hate or like each other we all gotta deal with everyones issues. This whole project seems like someone tried to fix something that wasn’t broken. Lord knows what they were smoking when they came up with this. And now it will cost money as well as excess green house gases produced from ryan and the DOTs excess fart sniffing binges.

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Rose Sullivan

Ryan, the majority of Sunnyside Residents DO NOT support this debacle on 39th Ave., as you can see from the negative comments and the dislikes and the many petitions against it that are being circulated. We are NOT PRIVILEGED residents and antagonizing the situation with nonsensical remarks and name calling just causes more anger and upset in what was once a quiet, friendly neighborhood that is now pitting neighbor against neighbor. Of course the residents of this community are not against safety or bike lanes. We’ve asked for stop signs, traffic lights and speed bumps in this area for years only to have our requests fall on deaf ears. The residents in this immediate community were NOT made aware of this new construction until we woke up on a Monday morning to the sound of jackhammers pounding away and lines being drawn in the street. Stop the “privileged” remarks and the antagonistic comments about residents who have lived here either their entire lives or most of their adult lives; and who have done a hell of a lot more for this community as a whole than those who are eager to cause disruption with sophomoric comments.

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Marvin Maples

Can we please discuss the horrific behavior by CB2 board member Stephen Cooper at this meeting? His unwarranted interrogation of a member of the public was completely and totally unacceptable. No matter what side of the debate you are on, NOBODY deserved to be treated the way that public commenter was. Hoping that somebody finally takes action about Stephen’s behavior because it is clear that he is unfit to serve on the board.
Maybe they can send a letter of censure to his home in Putman County 😛

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Boo-Boo

Many people in queens use their cars to make a living. My husband and I do. If we can’t park at night we will lose our income. We’ve both worked for 40 years and have never had to go on welfare. Did you think of people like us?

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Kool

He’s served on the board for decades. He is widely respected and highly valued. If you can’t take the heat get out of the kitchen. The opposition has played a filthy, faithless, cunning game of infiltration and destruction, never once trying to compromise. Only attack, attack, attack. They killed off civil public discourse in favor of their corporate puppeteers. Nope.

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Brandon Stanton

Glad to see this bike boulevard being constructed. A major improvement over the mess that 39av was previously

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Nom de plum

When will people realize that Sunnyside is a quiet neighborhood and we do not want bicycles whizzing through our neighborhood to get to the Queensboro Bridge. In the time of a pandemic, this decision demands a Community meeting in person and not a small group of cyclists who are not a major part of our community, with many long term residents including older people who use their cars for transportation, shopping etc and cannot ride bikes. We should not be a fly way from Jackson Heights through Sunnyside to get to the Queensboro Bridge.
The bikers already have Northern and Queens Blvd, 43rd Avenue and Skillman Ave. Why are you destroying our neighborhood.

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Marvin Maples

Absolute nonsense, this community is FULL of cyclists. There are many residents here, young and old, who bike to get around.

Just because they are not part of your social circle doesn’t mean they don’t exist. And there are many more who WISH they could bike, but are too afraid to do so without protected bike lanes.

Please be mindful of the other residents of the community, many of which are less privileged than you and do not have the same resources and time to attend community board meetings to advocate for themselves.

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Dona

Don’t pretend to be on the side of the downtrodden. You make us sick. DOT statistics say 45% of residents own cars and 17% ride bikes from occasionally to 3-5 times a week. You are the ones with privilege: strength, time and energy to ride bikes in a 300+ square mile city. In this stable community people have structured stable lives based on the ability to use cars when necessary. Mine cost $1,600 because it is 20 years old. That’s all I can afford. Not everyone is a rich homeowner with two SUVs.

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Gardens Watcher

Spare us the “privilege” argument. It just inflames the issue.

There are already are protected bike lanes going thru this neighborhood. The disruptive redesign of this short corridor isn’t the dealbreaker affecting a decision to use a bike, scooter, etc.

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JPS

Of course people should cycle if they do choose, however cyclists have skillman and 43rd avenues as well as queens and northern Blvd. This is overkill, dismissive to the community as a whole and unnecessary.

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Nom de plum

WHY do we need a bike boulevard to go through a quiet neighborhood that allows people to walk without whizzing bikes. This is a geographically poor area for a bike boulevard. It belongs on major streets like Queens and Northern Blvd and not a throughway for people from upper Queens to race through our NEIGHBORHOOD to the Queensboro Bridge. People who have cars need them for transportation and for older citizens to go shopping, go to doctors offices etc and people who Cannot or do not want to ride bikes. Make room for long-time residents to become active participants in the decisions for our neighborhood. No more closed zoom meetings. Time to have indoor participation for Sunnyside residents including long time residents. Become aware that we don’t want people flying through our neighborhood on bikes and scooters.

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Boo-Boo

I was stuck behind a garbage truck on 50th St. for twenty minutes one morning. With the bollards and painted lines I had no choice. This is affecting my ability to make my living. I dread the future here. while it may benefit a few residents, it handicaps those whose livelihood depends on cars. I do not think DOT cares one bit. The City has been captured by TA’s nasty tactics and methods. Laura Shepherd has a huge conflict of interest. She should not be on the board at all. She plans on hobbling Skillman Avenue, and removing more lanes on the bridge for people in cars. TA is full of ageists. They are hindering seniors and disabled people to benefit the young and healthy. Disgusting.

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Ouch

“Boo-Boo” it may interest you to know that some people ride a bicycle because they have limited mobility, and that riding a bicycle if useful if one has mundane ailments like plantar fasciitis or any foot or joint pain, and your assuming that people ride a bicycle are in no way in pain or disabled and are just young or completely healthy is a very shallow view.

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ABoondy

at least those trucks come in the morning. on my block they come at 2 AM and wake everyone up every Thursday, slamming all the furniture and metal things into their trucks, not to mention all the brake screeching for every garbage pickup. why cant they come during the day?

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Gardens Watcher

The metal vultures come thru at night before the Sanitation trucks collect the garbage.

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