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Police Seek Man Who Touched Woman’s Chest at Marshalls

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suspect

Suspect (NYPD)

Oct. 22, 2014 Staff Report

The police are looking for a man who allegedly grabbed a woman’s chest at Marshalls on Saturday.

The police said suspect approached a 55-year-old woman at the 48-18 Northern Boulevard store at about 6:40pm on October 18 and touched her with both hands—and then fled.

The victim was not hurt as a result of this incident.

The suspect has been described as a black male in his 20s, approximately 5’8″ and 160lbs. He was last seen wearing red pants, black t-shirt, black book bag and tan boots.

Anyone with information in regards to this assault is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800-577-TIPS.

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29 Comments

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vendor

I always feel weird about photos being posted of alleged perpetrators. Someone where I worked was posting up pictures of some alleged bad guy – turned out it was the person’s ex and the whole thing was part of some spat and not a police case.

Reply
Grace

Maybe than this stylish thug should come out and explain what happened.
Also where the hell is Marshall’s camera footage..

Reply
young woman

Its not about the color of skin if I see any man walking on my side of the street and he givea off a bad vibe I’m crossing the street ! If I see a group of young males and they are acting like animals I am going to move away. The prob is that it just happens to be that when these things do happen its a minority mb just mb the way to avoid this is just for all men to act proper and then color race etc wouldn’t b a factor

Reply
Anonymous visitor

“Fondled” does not apply in this situation. It sickens me that people here would rather focus on the man’s skin color than on the fact that he sexually assaulted a woman.

That kind of assault mars a woman’s life. I know women who won’t go out alone just for that reason.

But you don’t notice.

Reply
Ian Khadan

True, indeed. Thank you for pointing that out as that’s the ignorance of male privilege that has overtaken the comments to this post (and I include my own male privilege in that). It is still important to combat, through discourse, the original poster’s ignorant comment that was based in racist sentiment and it’s important for progress that these comments not go unchallenged. You are, however, correct in that the weighted aspect of this article is that a woman was assaulted and this is what should be the focal point in our conversation and in us, more importantly as Sunnyside residents, to be aware of as we move through our community.

Reply
Craic Dealer

Ian, you’re super verbose and its annoying. People can choose how they dress. Those Timberland’s are expensive! They choose to dress like thugs but you think its a “privilege” to NOT dress that way? You’re mentally hilarious.

Reply
Jeanann Khadan

Reading big words is hard, I know. Attire is not your issue and you know it, you stated your issue plainly in your first comment suggesting it’s wise for “SunnysidePosthatesme16” to keep racism behind closed doors like “normal” people. Had the young man been white—in the same attire—you’d never have used the term “thug” and the first commenter would never have posed that “they” should be avoided by crossing streets. Recall that the first two comments brought race into scope, not the other way around. No one is fooled. I’m more frightened in my own neighborhood now knowing you live and hate here. I’m deeply disturbed for the woman who was assaulted and it’s appalling that anyone would slap the broad stroke of “they” to the actions of one person rather than give support where needed most.

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Craic Dealer

Its not the big words, obvi. Its the roundabout way of saying something. It’s slightly hubris and major repellant to humans. Puffery comes to mind.

Well regardless, you and yours have the Liberty to be more than gracious by walking on the same side of the street as thugs who freely dress like thugs and fondle women.

Sooo much hate… soooo much.

Craic Dealer

When was that picture taken?!?! 9:00AM on Christmas day?! That area is jammed PACKED with people all the time.

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Grace

Most likely an old picture but whoever took the picture must have been cursing at that black car for being there and ruining a great picture.

Reply
www.shutupiankhadan.com

Ian, if we are such racist here in Sunnyside how come you took up residency in this neighborhood then? Maybe you should go live among people who have little respect for the law or any sort of established society. There you can have your very own soap box and preach the principles of people who do hold those values.

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Craic Dealer

Of course we walk on the other side of the street… you just don’t publically say it. You say it in private like every other normal person.

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Craic Dealer

It’s not racism when its true. Maybe you’d like to prove a point and walk down the same side of the street as a thug and thats why its called Liberty.

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Jeanann Khadan

One most certainly does not negate the other—while it is true that many people hide their racist drivel behind closed doors, it is nonetheless racist. “Thug” is a prop word used by cowards as a placeholder for taboo hate speech. And daring me to walk down the same side of the street as someone you perceive as a “thug” (by which I gather you mean “person of color”) is quite obviously pointless because you and I have wholly different ideas of who is dangerous.

Ian Khadan

It’s both unfortunate and sad that you don’t see the racist subtext embedded in your comments, even as overt as that subtext is. I’d suggest you read more on the subject of institutionalized racism, subvert racism, and white privilege if you’re going to attempt to make an argument in support of the original poster’s comment. Using language such as “they” and “thug” to generalize persons of color is both an innate and inherent racism that it seems you, Craic Dealer, and SunnysidePosthatesme16 are completely unaware of. This can be classified as inherent privilege that you carry with you that, unfortunately, you’ve neglected to acknowledge and compensate for. I do not blame you for your privilege, I blame you for your ignorance of it.

Craic Dealer

It’s not color at all for me. Its attire. If one has the Liberty to dress like a thug I am more than proud to walk on the other side of the street.

Craic Dealer

Its just funny you, Ian Khadan, would assume someone is ignorant when attire is a projection of ones-self to the world. You must think of yourself as holier-than-thou with your writing but you should save you childlike assumptions and catch up to some sort of reality.

Reply
Ian Khadan

I don’t have to assume you’re ignorant, you’ve proven it to me with your comments. In an attempt to backtrack and save face you’ve stumbled unto employing classist sentiment with your ‘attire’ argument. I’m sure you popped out of the womb with business attire on, yes? No I didn’t think so, and most people living below the poverty line stay without what you’d consider ‘proper attire’ for much of their lives if not the entirety of it. I don’t know how many more ways I can prove your privilege to you. It’s also evident that you prefer wasting your time looking up my name and the fact that I’m a writer rather than using the same tools to become learned about the obliviousness of your comments.

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