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Petunia is Renamed ‘Tiny You’

Photo: QueensPost

June 14, 2012 By Christian Murray

Petunia, the children’s boutique clothing store that opened in Sept. 2010, has changed its name to better reflect its product line.

The new name is “Tiny You” and represents the store’s evolution since it opened, according to Jill Callan, the owner of the store. Today, the boutique store carries a wider selection of boys’ products, items for children aged about 8 years, as well as more accessories & toys for babies.

Callan, a Woodside resident, said that she renamed the store, in part, to avoid any chance that customers might think it is a “girls” clothing store.

Callan said she loved the name Petunia, a pet name she was given as a child by her mother. However, she said that the name “‘Tiny You’ is a gender neutral name and better encompasses what this store is about.”

The store will continue to carry the same clothing lines, such as Mayoral, Bitz Kids, Sophie Catalou and Magnificent Baby.  Callan also said the store will continue to offer items produced by local designers.

The renaming is purely for rebranding purposes and does not reflect that the business is for sale. “I love this store and plan on being here for ages to come,” she said.

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