You are reading

NYC Elementary School Students to Return to In-Person Classes Next Monday

(Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)

Nov. 30, 2020 By Allie Griffin

New York City public schools will reopen in-person learning to elementary school students next Monday, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Sunday.

Students in 3-K and Pre-K programs as well as those in grades K through 5 will return to school buildings on Monday, Dec. 7. Students with disabilities will return to District 75 school buildings days later, on Thursday, Dec. 10.

Middle schoolers and high schoolers will continue remote learning for the time being, de Blasio said.

“Reopening our buildings is paramount to our city’s recovery from COVID-19,” he said in a statement. “That’s why we are doubling down on the safety and health measures that work to make in-person learning a reality for so many of our students.”

As part of the reopening plan, the city has committed to increase COVID-19 testing at schools. Every school will participate in random testing of 20 percent of their in-person population once a week.

The new weekly testing requirement represents a jump from the once-a-month testing schools participated in before de Blasio closed them on Nov. 19 — when the city positivity rate hit the 3 percent threshold previously decided as the marker to shutter public schools.

De Blasio said the 3 percent threshold for closing schools would be tossed and instead the city will assess potential closures based on individual schools testing data and cases.

All parents of students who have opted for in-person learning must fill out a mandatory consent form allowing their child to be tested for COVID-19 — unless they have a medical exemption. Parents can fill out the form online through their schools account.

The most recent positivity rate at city public schools is 0.28 percent or 453 positive cases out of 159,842 tests, according to the mayor’s office. The most recent 7-day rolling average positivity rate for all of New York City is 3.9 percent, de Blasio said.

The mayor also announced Sunday that public schools would work toward teaching students in-person five days a week. Currently, most students who opted for the in-person learning attend classes two or three times a week and learn online the other days of the week.

De Blasio said he hopes to see schools reach this goal for the more than 330,000 students who selected in-person in the coming weeks.

email the author: [email protected]

4 Comments

Click for Comments 
Maria Reyes

There will be many happy students, parents and teachers when they open next week. Students love learning and going to school.

Reply
Fan of Dough Boy Park

Let’s get these kids in class already. In my day we walked to school and from school uphill. Running from wolves and Ogres . We got a hot potato to keep ourselves warm in the winter mornings and then ate it for lunch. We didn’t have Mandalorian bounty hunters escorting us in lazer proof pods. These kids need toughening up like beef jerky.

5
20
Reply
Marie

Glad to know. I will reduce my babysitters hours beginning next week and save some money. Every savings counts.

1
6
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

Jan. 27, 2023 By Bill Parry

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.