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New Coat Drive Launched To Help Needy Families Fight Off The Cold This Winter

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Oct. 20, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

A borough-wide coat drive has been set up to help keep families in need warm this winter.

The initiative, which was launched Friday by Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee, seeks to collect as many coats as possible before the cold winter months set in.

Lee has teamed up with a number of community boards across the borough to help gather the coats.

Residents can donate new adult and children’s coats at Queens Borough Hall, located at 120-55 Queens Blvd., and at several community board offices throughout Queens. The drive ends Friday, Nov. 13.

Lee said that many families are struggling through the economic crisis and appealed to residents to donate warm coats for either adults or children.

“Need continues to grow in the ongoing pandemic, and with rising economic insecurity, so many are bracing for increasingly tough decisions,” Lee said. “In times of great need, however, Queens always pulls through, and we are in this together.”

Residents can drop off coats in the lobby of Queens Borough Hall on weekdays between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

The locations of participating community board offices are below with drop-off details:

  • Community Board 2: 43-22 50th St., Suite 2B, Woodside. By appointment only, call 718-533-8773.
  • Community Board 4: 46-11 104th St., Corona – By appointment only, call 718-760-3141.
  • Community Board 7: 133-32 41st Rd., Suite 3B, Flushing. Weekdays between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
  • Community Board 8: 197-15 Hillside Ave. in Hollis. By appointment only, call 718-264-7895.
  • Community Board 9: Queens Borough Hall (drop-off in lobby). Weekdays between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
  • Community Board 10: 115-01 Lefferts Blvd., South Ozone Park. Mondays between 9:00 a.m. and noon.
  • Community Board 12: 90-28 161st St., Jamaica. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays between 9:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.

For more information about the coat drive, click here.

The coat drive overlaps with the ongoing King’s Toy Drive at Borough Hall to help children battling cancer. The toy drive is hosted in partnership with the King Fights Cancer Foundation and the family of 7-year-old cancer survivor King Singh of Queens Village.

Residents can drop off new, unopened toys in “King’s Joy Box” in the lobby of Queens Borough Hall weekdays between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. through Oct. 30. Stuffed animals will not be accepted.

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