You are reading

COVID-19 Cases Continue to Increase Citywide, Concerning City Officials

Mayor Bill de Blasio (Michael Appleton/ Mayoral Photography Office)

Nov. 5, 2020 By Allie Griffin

City officials are concerned over a steady increase in COVID-19 cases citywide.

The number of new coronavirus cases has risen above the city’s cautionary threshold for nearly a week and it hit a new high on Tuesday — the date of the latest data available, Mayor Bill de Blasio said today.

The seven-day average of reported COVID-19 cases grew to 633 on Tuesday — well above the threshold of 550 cases that the Health Department set as an advisory marker when the city reopened over the summer.

“Again today, we’re noticeably above that threshold,” de Blasio said during a press briefing Thursday morning. “That’s an area of concern… We want to see that number go down.”

The average number of new cases has been above the 550 threshold since Thursday, Oct. 29. The number surpassed the threshold — that was set in August — for the first time last month.

De Blasio said part of the reason for the increase is due to increased COVID-19 testing citywide. Still, he said, the number needs to come down.

The increase in cases is one of three COVID-19 data points city officials collect to monitor the coronavirus in New York City. Each data point — new cases, positivity rate and new hospital admissions — has a threshold set by the Health Department.

The thresholds were used to determine when New York City could reopen over the summer. When the data fell below the set thresholds for consecutive days, the city lifted COVID-19 restrictions.

If the data rises above the threshold markers, the city could bring back restrictions and possible closures. An uptick in just one of these variables, however, is unlikely to lead to any restrictions in the short term.

Both new hospital admissions for suspected COVID-19 and the coronavirus positivity rate remain below their respective thresholds across the city.

The seven-day average of New York City residents who tested positive for the virus was at 1.81 percent on Tuesday, below the 5 percent threshold. However, de Blasio said it’s another number he would like to see decrease.

“That number puts it pretty much right in the middle of where we’ve been for the last few weeks — a level that we can work with, but a level we want to push down,” he said.

email the author: [email protected]

12 Comments

Click for Comments 
Valerie

This is because of Halloween 🎃 and social gatherings. There were plenty of people walking around with costume masks and no proper face masks. The city should band Biden’s presidential win and Thanksgiving celebrations.

13
5
Reply
Flatten the curve?

I guess herd immunity is no longer a thing. Amazing how the goal posts keep shifting in this thing.

16
2
Reply
Mac

Flatten- Maybe you should turn off Fox Entertainment and read a few news articles on the issue. Herd immunity doesn’t work on every virus. Sweden needed to enact new restrictions in the past few weeks. We know distancing and masks do work in slowing the spread of the virus as a study out of the Republican leaning state has just confirmed. Washing your hands also works. Politicizing the virus does not work in slowing the spread it actually has proven to worsen the pandemic that’s why America is number one in infections and deaths.

8
1
Reply
Piltdown Man

Science is not monolithic. There are many different theories, schools of thought, and conclusions in all the sciences. Dissent, and varying shades of opinion are not just welcome but necessary. You are confusing science with religion which is based on inflexible dogma. For many people, politics IS their religion hence the intolerence and comtempt for anyone whose opinion does not conform.

The scientists who say dogmatically now that masks are necessary are some of the same that said they weren’t necessary a few months ago. Perhaps you forgot. They may well be whistling a different tune tomorrow.

1
3
Reply
Gardens Watcher

The CDC just updated their findings today. Mask-wearing protects you AND those around you. Perhaps you should check out their website: cdc.gov

Reply
Payne

I’m assuming your livelihood isn’t tied to a restaurant? That’s why you just casually suggest something that takes away a source of income? Typical socialist; easy to just give others orders.

896
18
Reply
What happen to elegant dining

Payne- all of these outdoor ungly eyesore makeshift dining tents are empty . Hardly anyone is sitting outdoor anymore . Whats going to happen when snows these wannabe roofs not sturdy to hold snow . Time to take it down . Looks like refugee city .

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

Jan. 27, 2023 By Bill Parry

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.