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Application Period for Hunters Point South Has Begun

Hunters Point South building

Photo Courtesy of Related Companies

Oct. 15, 2014 By Christian Murray

The application period for the apartments at the Hunters Point South Development in Long Island City went live today.

The application forms can be filled out on line at New York Housing Connect, which requires applicants to provide details such as their income and apartment sought.

Those interested have until December 15 to submit an application.

There are 925 apartments up for grabs, with 186 apartments available to those applicants who fall into the “low income” bracket. To qualify as low income, an applicant seeking a studio cannot make more than $30,000—while a family seeking a 3 bedroom unit must earn less than $50,000 per year.

For those who qualify for the “low income” bracket, the rents would range in price from $494 per month for a studio to as high as $959 for a three bedroom.

However, the limits are significantly higher for the 738 “moderate income” apartments on offer. The maximum income permitted to be eligible for a studio is a little over $130,000, while the maximum household income for a 3 bedroom unit is about $225,000.

The rents for “moderate income” earners will range from $1,561-$1997 for a studio, $1,965-2,509 for a one bedroom, $2,366-$3,300 for a 2 bedroom and $2,729-$4,346 for a three bedroom.

Preference will be given to applicants who live within the Community Board 2 district, which covers Sunnyside, Woodside and Long Island City.

affordablerents affordablehousingmoderate income

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12 Comments

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Nowhere man

still better then the $1600 a month they charge for crappy old studios with roaches in Sunnyside! What do you guys think my chances are of scoring a studio if I live in Sunnyside and middle income? I would say 5% at best.

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A.Bundy

a quarter of a million in salary is moderate income? i didnt know there were so many million dollar jobs out there! oh wait, there aren’t any. this city sucks! $2k a month for a studio? LMFAO! you can get a cheaper place in manhattan!

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Kingkong

Once again the middle class got shafted. NYC is becoming a city where its beneficial to either be really poor or really rich.

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SunnysidePosthatesme16

This is a big joke. No way I’m telling people how much I make so they can raise rents on me, Thats Commie crap.

Reply
Anonymous

Let me guess you’re paid under the table, way to avoid taxes and not contribute to the betterment of Sunnyside

Reply
Sunnysider

Even with a 190k salary, my husband and I can’t afford their 2 bedroom middle class apartment! Ugh!

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