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Woodside Library to Reopen for ‘To-Go’ Service Starting April 21

Woodside Library (Photo: Nathaly Pesantez)

April 16, 2021 By Christian Murray

The Queens Public Library announced Thursday that it will be reopening the Woodside branch—along with four others for “to-go” service Wednesday.

The library system currently has 34 branches open for to-got service and after Wednesday it will have 39 up and running. The branches to be added in addition to Woodside are Baisley Park, Douglaston, Howard Beach and Middle Village.

Under the “to-go” model, residents can request items online, through the QPL app or by phone and pick them up in a designated area of each branch building. Residents can return materials in the exterior return machines.

The Woodside branch—along with the four others– will be open three days per week during the following hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Friday (with a one-hour closure from 1 to 2 p.m. for cleaning); and noon to 7 p.m. on Thursdays (with a one-hour closure from 3 to 4 p.m. for cleaning).

The Queens Public Library system closed all 66 of its branches on March 16, 2020 to stop the spread of COVID-19 and has been gradually reopening branches on a to-go basis since. The first branches reopened on July 13.

Library visitors as part of to-go service are not permitted to browse shelves or use public computers inside branch buildings. Visitors are also required to wear masks and social distance.

A list of all QPL locations with to-go service are listed here.

email the author: news@queenspost.com
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