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Woman Killed by Stray Bullet That Entered Jackson Heights Apartment Wednesday: NYPD

The woman was found inside 91-16 34th Ave. (Google Maps)

Sept. 30, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

A 43-year-old woman was killed by a stray bullet that went through her bedroom window in Jackson Heights early Wednesday, police said.

Bertha Arriaga, who lived in an apartment on 34th Avenue near 92nd Street, was discovered by her 14-year-old son lying on the floor in her bedroom at around 12:45 a.m., according to police.

He called the police and cops found Arriaga with a gunshot wound to the head and EMS pronounced her dead at the scene.

Police said there were reports of gunfire in the area at the time.

Arriaga had heard noises outside on the street and went to look out the window when she was shot, her brother-in-law told PIX11 News.

Arriaga’s husband, Jorge Aguilar, who was sleeping in another room when the incident occurred, tried to perform CPR on his wife, the news outlet reported.

The victim is also survived by two other sons aged 10 and 6, according to PIX11 News.

Aguilar said that she was an extraordinary wife and a devoted mother.

“She was the best wife of all…She cared deeply about the kids,” Aguilar told PIX11 News.

The investigation is ongoing and no arrests have been made, police said.

 

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11 Comments

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Go Fund Me site?

Is there a Go Fund Me site?
Can we raise $500,000 for a high school and college fund for our neighbor’s children?

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Joe

The guy that pulled the trigger should be in prison for life, better yet, an expedite death sentence, so our taxes are not wasted on him.

I am sick of this and the lack of attention from “our leaders”, it would be good to at least, hear from them about it.

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#dumpdeblasio

It’s Cuomo sans deblasio New York
They don’t care about crime victims
In fact they love criminals
Prayers for this woman’s family

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ABoondy

agreed. i noticed a long time ago that criminals are an important demographic for Democrat vote support and are aggressively protected.

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rosa

Jackson heights has a history of being dangerous. Some people think is safe but it’s not and neither is corona. They need to move out here and start gentrifying these neighborhoods!!!

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ABoondy

we are safe when nyc brings back the expedited death penalty for convicted killers. victims families waiting 30 years for that execution get no justice. these killers could care less who they hit.

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Bob

NYC has become one of many US cities where law and order no longer exists while the mayor and city council sit around worrying about getting re-elected and continued support for those destroying the cities. Now I see daily examples of filth on the street, homelessness, mentally ill taking up camp in every neighborhood, graffiti, looting, shootings, motorcycle drag racing, fireworks and much more.

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Joe

This needs to stop, shootings in NYC are out of control, gun charges should change and be a lot tougher, 30+ years minimum, or is there a justification for someone to shoot a gun randomly in the middle of the street?
30+ to life.

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