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Van Bramer Calls for Expanded Safety Netting After More Debris Falls From 7 train

Twitter @jimmyvanbramer

Aug. 22, 2019 By Shane O’Brien

Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer has called on the MTA to expand the safety netting under the 7 train after another piece of debris fell from the elevated tracks in Woodside on Wednesday.

A chunk of metal fell from the elevated subway line close to the 52nd Street-Lincoln Avenue station on Roosevelt Avenue yesterday morning, according to Van Bramer.

Van Bramer was alerted to the incident by a constituent and took to Twitter to emphasize the need to expand the safety netting beyond the 61st Street station before someone gets seriously injured.

The MTA installed netting at the 61st Street station last month after a spate of incidents involving falling debris. The netting is 600 feet long and 50 feet wide and provides the only protection from falling debris along the 7 line.

“Once again, it’s clear that the netting that has been installed at 61st Street needs to be expanded along the entire 7 line before someone gets hurt. We must ensure the safety of all residents in Woodside and across our city,” said Van Bramer in a separate statement.

Debris struck two cars near the 61st station in February and March, prompting calls for the MTA to install netting. In one incident, a wooden beam fell from the tracks near 65th Street and pierced the windshield of a vehicle below. No one was injured.

The netting at 61st Street was installed as part of a pilot program launched in July. Netting has gone up near the 39th Avenue N/W station and two other stations across the city. The MTA is testing their effectiveness.

The MTA said the area around 51st Street and Roosevelt where yesterday’s incident took place is safe and that the agency has already conducted an inspection.

“The object that fell reflects no structural risk but is obviously a serious matter,” the MTA said in statement. “This area was re-inspected Wednesday to ensure that there are no other loose pieces there.”

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5 Comments

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Sara Ross

They’ve been working on repairs on the 7 train for at least 20 years! Who do they have working on them – children? Somebody has got to be held accountable before somebody gets killed!

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Elias Thienpont, Richardton, ND

Netting is a fuzzy idea whose time never was nor ever will be. Sure they can string nets, and yes they will stop some stuff, but not all stuff. Lets face it, the els have to be rebuilt, it will cost a fortune. but it can be done, and without stopping service.

You reinforce the piers and then you build a fiberglass trough around all of the metal work. Put some insulating material in there to deaden the sounds, but still easily removable for servicing the structure. Plastic pellets ought to do well.

Sure it cost more money, but it either needs to be done or the sky will continue to fall

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Oscar

Great idea – I have a similar one, just use the existing iron structure as scaffolding to build engineered trusses and trestles for a MONORAIL, which is more technically reliable, then remove all the old structure opening up light and space. But only a private corporation has the technological innovation and motivation to do that. Let Bezos or Elon Musk get on it in exchange for the tax breaks they wanted to move into LIC. State-run, bureaucratic, politically tainted civil mass transit systems have failed. No amount of money thrown at the MTA will fix anything; it will just go towards debt, payroll, and pensions.

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Oscar

Great idea – I have a similar one, just use the existing iron structure as scaffolding to build engineered trusses and trestles for a MONORAIL, which is more technically reliable, then remove all the old structure opening up light and space. But only a private corporation has the technological innovation and motivation to do that. Let Bezos or Elon Musk get on it in exchange for the tax breaks they wanted to move into LIC. State-run, bureaucratic, politically tainted civil mass transit systems have failed. No amount of money thrown at the MTA will fix anything; it will just go towards debt, payroll, and pensions.

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I live in Woodside

I am afraid to cross the street under the 7 tracks not knowing if I will get hit with some debris .
MTA are you waiting for someone to get killed in order to do something . So much OT and what kind of work is is being done.

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