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Sunnyside Gardens Burglary Suspect Nabbed by Cops Just 50 Feet From Van Bramer’s Home

Police search for clues near Van Bramer’s house. (Photo: August 11)

Aug. 20, 2013 By Christian Murray

The police arrested a man in Sunnyside Gardens Tuesday morning who is most likely responsible for a series of break ins in the landmarked district—including councilman Jimmy Van Bramer’s house.

The suspect was caught at 4:00am Tuesday morning in a courtyard between 46th and 47th Streets (btw. Skillman and 39th Avenues), according to Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer.

The alleged perpetrator was picked up by the police on a trespassing charge just 50 feet away from Van Bramer’s house, which was burgled 10 days ago. The suspect had been lurking in the courtyard, casing out homes, Van Bramer said.

The man allegedly was in possession of several stolen items that belonged to a Sunnyside Gardens home owner. He has a rap sheet that includes several burglaries.

“I think it is very likely that this was the burglar [who broke in to my house],” Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer said. “He has a long rap sheet and was found close to my home.”

Van Bramer said he is hopeful that the arrest will help the recent jump in burglaries in Sunnyside Gardens subside.

“I applaud the 108 precinct for their quick response ,” Van Bramer said. He also praised the precinct for apprehending the man allegedly responsible for a string of arsons.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

40 Comments

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Dorothy Morehead

Community policing wasn’t community patrols or auxiliaries, though they could be part of it. A primary component was having one or two officers assigned to a community who could be contacted directly by residents. Residents could contact the officer about quality of life issues without filing a formal complaint. Presumably, the officer developed a better understanding of the community, learning where the problems were and dealing with them.

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Keeping it real

@JulieJ. We all know [who you are], so please drop the facade. And honestly, when the police solve crimes you dismiss them and say it’s political, when your personal problem doesn’t get solved, you say the police don’t do their job. Please stop all the hate mongering. Just stop.

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SuperWittySmitty

Why can’t you do community policing, Chris? Organize something, if you think it’s necessary.

I walk around my neighborhood at night, sometimes near midnight, and I’ve never encountered a dangerous situation or even a feelling of danger in the almost 20 years I’ve lived here. I live on the south side, near St. Teresa’s- feels pretty safe around. I see cops around on a regular basis but I don’t think any are assigned to walk a beat. Not sure I want people to be “thinking like scum” to be “patroling” my block, but if that’s the best we can do….

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Chris

@dorothy morehead I wish we could do community policing. I would definitely be able to do a better job then the 108. Gotta think like scum to catch scum

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Anonymous

Part of the problem is there are no beat cops WALKING the streets anymore. It used to be there was a bit of fear in thugs because a cop could be right around the corner. They know that’s not the case anymore.

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house of O'shea

Smitty u know when I’ll appreciate a cop?
When the post has a picture of a beat cop nabbing a would be thief by the knickers. When criminals are truly afraid of the 108th
When they treat all crimes the same
When crime scenes are preserved.
When anyone can walk and jog at night safely without being killed.
When I stop seeing our cars on cinder blocks.

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SuperWittySmitty

The cops get criticized when they don’t catch the bad guys and also when they do catch the bad guys. I’ll bet the cops are just as frustrated as the teachers are- they get all the blame but not a lot of credit, no matter how hard they work.

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Craic Dealer

@JulieJ.: Sorry to hear about that burglary. Out of curiosity, what are your cross streets? Feel free to be more general like North or South… or refuse to answer. lol

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JulieJ.

House of O’Shea: you don’t belong to the privileged NYC council (which hates the police) so, you don’t count. They hate the police until they need them.

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house of O'shea

The 108th is slower than frozen molasses. Catch the car vandals. Is that such an impossible request?

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Kramden's Delicious Marshall

@anonymous,

What does the size of the perp’s willy have to do with it?

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Sycamore

@Matt C Bullseye!

@Spartan47 Why do you use “old women” as an insult? Its use belies a misogyny underlying our culture. Get with it. Women are gaining power. IF the tables turn quickly enough some may be calling those they disdain “young men,” because they are the least valued members of society.

@Kramden Your rational explanation will go right over the heads of most readers here. They go for the juiciest put down rather than the facts.

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86Mets

This guy isn’t too bright to come back to the same place after all the publicity his last break-in got. Cops just love a dumb criminal.

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JulieJ.

A bad burglary and I have a good idea who did it as do the police. But they don’t ask the right questions.

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Anonymous

Perhaps this suspect is also involved in previous burglaries and the Sunnyside Post isn’t saying so because it wasn’t told. You guys know that the police withhold information sometimes in order to see what they can get out of a suspect? That’s not just on TV, they really do that.

Also, posting on here that you want your case re-opened is not likely to get any action because even if the appropriate people at the 108 are reading these comments, they can’t possibly know your real name.

I wonder if those who are complaining here are contacting the precinct AND the Councilman’s office about it. Or go to the next community council meeting. I hear these meetings are not overflowing with people.

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Kramden's Delicious Marshall

spartan, I agree, it’s a nice job by the police. The point people are making, however, is why don’t the police do as nice a job when it’s only regular Joe Nobody who is affected by a crime? It seems they only hustle when a VIP is concerned and the media spotlight gets turned on them. That doesn’t bother you?

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spartan47

marc c, there r a bunch of whiney old wash women on here ,i totally agree good job,for the cops.

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Eileen

Cheers to the 108th prescient for doing a great job. I love knowing my community is so well protected.

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JulieJ.

Obviously, there were plain clothes police in the Gardens. What happened to justice for all?

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Casey

This guy must be a complete moron. There has been a ton of cops around the last few days, especially early in the morning.

Good job by the police.

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JulieJ.

I want my own case reopened and solved. They certainly had leads and yes, they are locals. Oh, yeah: when Jimmy and Eric are crime victims the 108th gets its act together. Otherwise, you might as well hire private detective.

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Me

hmmmmmmmm the 108th catch a burglar AND an arsonist asap – why??? cause it was Goias home & Van Bramers – otherwise you & I would still be waiting!

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Oldschool Sunnysider

Where the hell has the “quick response” been for the last few years as home after home is broken into, as well as the rash of automobile wheel thefts in the Gardens? The 108th only gets its act together when its under pressure from politicos, otherwise its “waddya waaant uuus tooo dooo? Weeee toook yaaa staaatement!”

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Kramden's Delicious Marshall

“I applaud the 108 precinct for their quick response ,” Van Bramer said.

Of course he applauds them. When a politician is victimized, the cops spring into action. The people who were burglarized in the weeks and months previous to him are probably somewhat less impressed.

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