You are reading

Queens Catholic Schools Will Remain Open Even if Public Schools Shutter, Diocese Says

St. Sebastian Catholic Academy in Woodside (Photo: Queens Post)

Nov. 16, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Catholic schools in Queens and Brooklyn will remain open for in-person learning even if New York City public schools shutter due to a spike in COVID-19 cases, the Superintendent of Catholic Schools for Brooklyn and Queens announced Sunday.

Queens and Brooklyn Catholic schools will continue to provide in-person instruction five days a week, regardless as to whether Mayor Bill de Blasio shuts down in-person classes for public school students — something he warned could be just days away.

The Brooklyn Diocese — which also represents the borough of Queens — has had children in school buildings for more than two months without issue and will continue to do so, Superintendent Dr. Thomas Chadzutko said.

“For more than eight weeks, we have been able to maintain in-person learning for our students, mostly five days a week, and we intend to keep doing so going forward this school year,” Chadzutko said. “We know how critical it is for the development of our students to keep our schools open.”

The superintendent made the announcement as the city’s seven-day rolling average positivity rate nears the 3 percent threshold de Blasio set as the marker to close public schools.

The city’s seven-day positivity rate was at 2.77 percent on Saturday — a slight dip from a day earlier when it reach 2.94 percent, according to city Health Dept. data.

De Blasio has held firm on his promise to shutter in-person learning at public schools if the rate reaches 3 percent.

Chadzutko, meanwhile, said all 69 Catholic schools and academies across Queens and Brooklyn will stay open for their students.

“Our children want to be in the classroom and we want them to be there for as long as safely possible,” he said.

email the author: [email protected]

3 Comments

Click for Comments 
#dumpcuomo

I wonder how many parents are sorry that St. Raphael and St. Teresa are gone. They were good schools, had great teachers and motivated students. And certainly they would have found a way around Covid restrictions.

Reply
Tina

Parents pay a good amount of money to send their children to Catholic school. It makes sense that it stays open because many parents would demand some money back if they switched to remote learning. My granddaughter saved a bunch of money this year because college dorms are closed in her NJ Campus and remote learning was the only option.

3
8
Reply
They do?

I taught Catholic school and you’d think they’re paying people but they aren’t. Most have children who somehow received grants from guilty successful white dudes trying to buy their way into Heaven. Ps… Most of those granters were very ill behaved.

4
2
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.

LaGuardia Community College President Kenneth Adams explained that the school lost nearly a quarter of its students at the height of the pandemic due to the economic effects of the lockdown on low-income Queens households.

BP launches new advisory panel for youth to become civically engaged in the future of Queens

In an effort to get more young people involved in civics, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards has created a new advisory panel known as the Youth and Young Adult Council to introduce the “youngest and fiercest” community advocates to both community service and organization.

Members of the advisory body will advocate concerns through means of community engagement by participating in one of two cohorts. The first will be made up of high school representatives between the ages of 13 and 17, while the second cohort will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 18 and 25.

Raga sworn in as first-ever Filipino American elected to the state Legislature

More than 300 community members attended the historic inauguration of Assemblyman Steven Raga as the first Filipino American elected to office in New York state.

Many who attended the swearing-in event at the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows Corona Park wore traditional and cultural attire to the event at the building that once housed the General Assembly of the newly formed United Nations from 1946-50 until its current home in Manhattan became available for the world body.