You are reading

Queens Approaching 50,000 Cases of COVID-19

The testing line at Elmhurst Hospital (Photo: Queens Post)

April 30, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Queens is approaching 50,000 cases of COVID-19 as the pandemic continues to halt daily life in New York City.

The World’s Borough continues to have the highest count of residents infected with the coronavirus among the five boroughs.

Queens has had 49,559 residents inflicted with the deadly virus, while the city as a whole has more 159,000 positive cases as of Tuesday evening, according to data from the city’s Department of Health.

The borough has more cases of the virus than several countries, including Belgium, the Netherlands and India, according to counts by the New York Times. It also isn’t far behind the whole country of Canada, which has 50,373 cases of the virus.

Coronavirus has killed 4,817 Queens residents — with 3,755 COVID-positive fatalities and 1,062 probable fatalities. The Health Department defines a probable fatality as a person who was never tested for the virus but a medical examiner determined the cause of death to be COVID-19 related.

The neighborhoods of Corona, Elmhurst and Jackson Heights remain at the epicenter of the virus.

There have been 3,441 residents of Corona (zip code 11368) who have tested positive– more than any other neighborhood by zip code. There were 2,622 cases in Elmhurst and 2,023 in Jackson Heights.

Citywide, the disease has claimed the lives of 17,589 New Yorkers — including both confirmed and probable cases of the virus.

email the author: [email protected]

9 Comments

Click for Comments 
Gardens Watcher

Kathy, Cuomo is now asking for hospitals to provide lots more detail about the new cases. Hopefully that data will lead to a more targeted plan to deal with this virus. This will be way more detail than just zip codes.

The virus isn’t going away anytime soon, and it knows no boundaries. So we all have to continue to act as if our lives and our neighbors lives are on the line — because they are.

Reply
Bobb

Martial law is the only option if ppl truly want this virus to stop spreading and be over with

Reply
Kathy

NYC needs to release “new” virus infection data by zip code. If NYC’s “new” cases continue to drop, it doesn’t mean that the cases in Queens are dropping too. The Emhurst, Corona and JH figures could continue to grow but that would be masked by the “total” borough figures. This info is crucial for Queens residents so that they can protect themselves, and not be guided by the city’s or borough’s aggregate tally.

8
1
Reply
Doug

I still can’t get tested. My doctor will not do it and i don’t live at NYCHA or one of the neighborhoods the city considers minority and poor.

15
Reply
Guest 2

Subways and subways
Large groups living together
Volleyball and soccer games during lockdown and again subways

19
Reply
Guest

Why isn’t anyone studying he reason for this particular neighborhood to have such high number. Everyone is in the dark. Life has to go back to normal, only way is with proper flow of information. NY is in dark ages compared to Asia when it comes to prevention and communication.

18
2
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

Jan. 27, 2023 By Bill Parry

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.