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Preschool Opening on 44th Street, Affiliated with ‘Little Friends’

Sunnyside Friends

Sunnyside Friends

Aug. 5, 2015 By Christian Murray

Little Friends, a preschool located on 47th Street, is opening an affiliate on 44th Street.

The new school—aptly called Sunnyside Friends—will open at 41-32 44th Street next month and will have room for two classrooms, according to Sara Stare, an employee.

The expansion comes just one year after Mayor de Blasio introduced the city’s universal pre-K program, which requires students to be at school for 6 1/2 hours per day.

Currently, Little Friends on 47th Street offers two programs—one that is 2 ½ hours per day and the other that is 5 ½ hours per day, Stare said.

With the new facility, Little Friends will offer three 6 ½-hour-day classes on 47th Street and two 6 ½ hour-day classes on 44th Street.

Little Friends

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20 Comments

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Anonymous visitor

Clean streets- are you even aware of how much of a j*rk you sound like?

I guess you’re the perfect parent huh? Please enlighten us, how do you do it?

Reply
clean streets

Rep:”Anonymous visitor” quite easy actually-I’m a productive member of society, i believe that one is not entitled to anything without first working for it. Respect is something you earn and is not a given. Parents are first and foremost responsible for their children s behavior and education and that it is not the governments responsibility….will i keep going or have you already lost interest?

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Anonymous visitor

Duh, way to state the obvious!! No need to start talking about “Fritos and moms on their fat asses”. think we are just wired differently- not even worth the argument.

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clean streets

if you were current with city hall policy and fully understood what the basis of d Blasios pre-k program was about then you might be able to make an intelligent argument, Instead of criticizing other peoples comments. .I Don’t fully understand why you find my comment offensive

Reply
MaryKate

If you don’t understand why your post is offensive there is clearly no hope for you

Sensible

Great Clean Streets, please opt out of social security then when you are old. I don’t want my kids working to support you.

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Sunnyside mom

Hey talk for yourself. I’m a mother of two. And always been. working .Don’t be a hater.

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clean streets

Just Deblasio’s way of having parents that do little now with their kids do even less. well i suppose if the kids are in pre-k for 6 hours a day they wont be eating fritos and watching jerry Springer with their fat assed mothers

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Adrian

Mayor Big Bird! That is hilarious! Did you make that up all by yourself? How long did it take to be so funny? I look forward to your future posts.

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Rocky Balboa

First of all, it’s not free – your tax dollars are paying for this – and, by the way, for a long time, kindergarten was not mandatory! This is, for the most part, government run garbage. And wait until they pledge allegiance to Mayor Big Bird a/k/a DeBlasio

Reply
JM

Shouldn’t you be out in the mountains, living off the grid? Those FEMA thugs are coming to cart you off to a re-education camp.

Reply
ann

Indoctrination? from coloring, dress up, playing house, learning to read, drinking juice, eating cookies, playing with blocks, and nap time?

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Anonymous visitor

Fair- the GREAT news is UPK is free so that should take some burden off of parents…. Well free as in funded by our tax dollars.

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Kevin Bacon Forever

yeah but many people also choose to be parents because they want to raise their kids by being a stay at home parent but cant, so these places are popping up everywhere.

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Anonymous gal

Kevin Bacon Forever…….read the story….it’s NOT day care……….it’s Pre-K…
Its only 6 1/2 hours a day of school. Not enough hours to work to pay the rent as you claim. These places are sprouting up because last year the city made universal Pre-K mandatory.
Please fully read the article before you comment and show your ignorance.

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Anonymous visitor

Kevin- just a little FYI- some parents choose to work outside of the home because they actually LIKE their careers that they have worked many many many years to build. It’s not always about the $.

Maybe I’m misreading, if so, I apologize but you seem to have a judgemental tone. Surely you posted that comment to stir it up – success:)

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Kevin Bacon Forever

of course! mom and dad gotta pay rent on the sunnyside two brdm, gotta put little johnny somewhere for the day. thats why these places are popping up like weeds.

Reply
Craic Dealer

Rent is too damn high because the price of money (interest rate) is controlled by a tiny group of people (The Federal Reserve) instead of the activity of The People.

Reply

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