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Plan to Create Pedestrian Lane on Queensboro Bridge Delayed, Pols Want Answers

The existing pathway on the northern outer roadway, pictured, was scheduled to be repurposed for bicycles this year (Photo by Michael Dorgan, Queens Post)

Feb. 4, 2022 By Michael Dorgan

The city’s plan to convert a car lane into a pedestrian pathway on the Queensboro Bridge will be delayed until at least 2024, the DOT announced yesterday.

The DOT announced Thursday that it is about to start major repairs to the upper deck of the Queensboro Bridge that will take until December 2023 to complete — and that the work must be finished before a car lane can be repurposed into a lane dedicated for pedestrians.

The repairs will mean that pedestrians and cyclists will have to continue to share a narrow pathway on its northern outer roadway until at least 2024, which safety advocates say is dangerous.

The 2024 date is a departure from an earlier announcement when the DOT said it would convert a car lane on the southern outer roadway for pedestrians by the end of 2022. That plan, announced in April 2021, would also have seen the existing pathway on the northern outer roadway repurposed for bicycles only.

Council Members Julie Won and Julie Menin, who both represent neighborhoods on either side of the bridge, are urging the DOT to find ways to expedite the repairs to the upper deck which will make way for a separate pedestrian lane and dedicated bike path sooner. They said the bridge is an important artery in the city’s bike infrastructure.

“Creating safer pedestrian and bike access to the Queensboro Bridge is a top priority in District 26 and we have been excited about this project since its announcement last year,” Won said in a statement.

Pedestrians and cyclists will have to continue to share a narrow pathway on the bridge’s northern outer roadway, pictured, until at least 2024 which safety advocates say is dangerous. (Photo by Michael Dorgan, Queens Post)

Won and Menin penned a joint letter to DOT Commissioner Ydanis Rodriguez Thursday outlining how the repairs—which will start later this month—will prolong the treacherous situation on the northern outer roadway where pedestrians and cyclists share the narrow strip along the bridge.

The lawmakers requested a meeting with the agency to come up with ways to expedite the timeline of the repair work. They also want to find solutions to minimize the disruption the work will have on all bridge users—while recognizing that the repair work needs to be done.

“This repair work is necessary for the bridge and its long-term health. However, this delayed and prolonged timeline presents grave concerns for our constituents,” the letter reads.

The repair work consists of replacing the bridge’s upper deck in order to extend its life span by up to 75 years, according to the DOT. The bridge opened in 1909 and is the busiest of the four DOT East River crossings with a daily traffic volume of around 170,000 vehicles.

The approaches to the upper deck of the bridge will be replaced along with deck joints and barriers on the upper roadway. Some of the other work being earmarked for completion includes installing new LED lights on the lower level, drainage improvements, structural steel repairs and painting.

The conversion of the vehicle lane and the repurposing of the pedestrian lane cannot commence while the bridge repair work is taking place since at least one vehicle lane on the upper deck will be closed at all times to store construction materials and equipment.

Additionally, the bridge will have two traffic lanes closed during off-peak periods.

The council members said that the sustained lane closures could create a problematic traffic situation causing arduous delays and spilling over to the local streets in both Manhattan and Queens. They are asking the DOT what its mitigation plans are while the repairs are being made and how the work can be expedited.

“Our constituencies are both concerned about the increased traffic congestion and the safety conditions for bikers and pedestrians during this construction timeline,” the letter reads. “We need a shorter timeline to better serve New Yorkers.”

The narrow pathway on the northern outer roadway is currently shared by bicyclists and pedestrians (Photo: Queens Post)

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9 Comments

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Bicycles/E-bikes/Mopeds Hurt Walkers

Keep the bicycle lanes FAR away from walking lanes. Bring back the outer car lanes and build a new bridge for cycling and walking that doesn’t add to the cities congestion woes.

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John

This project is needed!
The funny part about it is that people will turn around and tell you the bike are safe and the same time they complain about them on this bridge saying they are unsafe.

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K duffy

Why not install a lightweight upper walkway “pedestrian walkway” overkill the north current walkway/bikeway?
Pedestrians and walkers should not mix.

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Lucky number 7 train

If anyone has ever walked that bridge they would know how dangerous it is with cyclists, e bikes and mopeds. I would walk it more often but I’ve seen to many accidents.

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I agree, they should build a separate bike lane

Great point, the bike lane would be a LOT safer. Thanks for your support!

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Edd

Amazing news. Hopefully it will be delayed until 2055 that be even better lol. If they were to raise ticket prices on cyclist they could use that money and build them a bridge just for bicyclist and pedestrian.

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get rid of the bike lanes

WE NEED more car lanes. They should build a new bridge for bikes only and put back the outer lower lanes for cars. I hate how bikes are taking over but yet don’t know how to obey traffic lights. Police need to ticket bikes just like cars.

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Lenape Lady

For God’s sake. Cyclists have to learn that there are places they need to walk their bikes!

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