You are reading

NYC Neighborhoods Hit Hardest by COVID-19 Have Lower Vaccination Rates

New Yorkers receive COVID-19 vaccines at New York State Vaccination Site at Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem (Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Office via Flickr)

Feb. 17, 2021 By Allie Griffin

Some of the neighborhoods that were hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City have the lowest vaccination rates for the virus, new ZIP code data shows.

Queens neighborhoods like Corona — once called the “epicenter of the epicenter” of the pandemic — and Far Rockaway — where one out of every 11 people was diagnosed with COVID-19 — have particularly low vaccination rates compared to the rest of the city.

Just 3 percent of adults in Corona (11368) and 4 percent of adults in Far Rockaway (11691) have had  the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to the health data released Tuesday.

Corona’s rate is at half of Queens’ overall vaccination rate — 6 percent of adults in Queens have had the first dose of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine.

The largely Hispanic immigrant community saw the greatest number of deaths and the most cases of COVID-19 in May.

Far Rockaway, a predominantly Black community, had the third highest death rate in the city in May. According to city data, 410 Far Rockaway residents have died from COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic.

Black and Hispanic New Yorkers have died at roughly twice the rate of white New Yorkers and the death rate increases as income level decreases across the boroughs, according to the city.

However, more white New Yorkers have received at least one dose of the potentially life-saving vaccine. According to city data, 43 percent of New Yorkers who received the first shot are white, while just 11 percent are Black and 16 percent are Latino.

The disparity in deaths as well as vaccination rates is best illustrated when comparing one end of the Rockaway Peninsula to the other.

On the end opposite Far Rockaway, Breezy Point (11697) — a predominantly white and affluent neighborhood where eight people have died of the coronavirus — has had 27 percent of its adult population partially vaccinated.

The median household income in Breezy Point is more than double the median household income in Far Rockaway, according to census data.

The Rockaways had no city-run coronavirus testing site until roughly three months into the pandemic.

Then-Council Member Donovan Richards said the delay cost lives.

Now, as Queens Borough President, Richards is repeating his warning.

Numbers don’t lie — the City’s own data shows communities of color in Queens and across NYC are being vaccinated at remarkably lower rates than other areas,” Richards wrote on Twitter. “But this distribution disparity isn’t just incredibly frustrating, it’s potentially fatal.”

Other areas of Southeast Queens where many Black residents live, also have low vaccination rates. Only 3 percent of adults in Springfield Gardens/ Rochdale Village/ St. Albans (11434), South Jamaica (11436), Laurelton (11413), Rosedale (11422) have gotten their first shot.

“A lot of this is about underlying painful disparities to begin with and inequalities to begin with,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news briefing Tuesday. “Folks who have more privilege are best able to navigate [the vaccination] process.”

Geography

email the author: [email protected]

4 Comments

Click for Comments 
Beth

Well not everyone is a celebrity or politician surrounded by doctors and healthcare workers while getting a shot. I cant get an appointment with my primary care doctor to get a shot. I do not want to to my local pharmacies that can not even answer basic questions when i ask.

1
1
Reply
Margarita

Many of us do not like the cold and snow. To cold to wait outside for the shot. Put some heaters outside like you do for people who go to restaurants.

4
7
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.

LaGuardia Community College President Kenneth Adams explained that the school lost nearly a quarter of its students at the height of the pandemic due to the economic effects of the lockdown on low-income Queens households.

BP launches new advisory panel for youth to become civically engaged in the future of Queens

In an effort to get more young people involved in civics, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards has created a new advisory panel known as the Youth and Young Adult Council to introduce the “youngest and fiercest” community advocates to both community service and organization.

Members of the advisory body will advocate concerns through means of community engagement by participating in one of two cohorts. The first will be made up of high school representatives between the ages of 13 and 17, while the second cohort will be comprised of young adults between the ages of 18 and 25.

Raga sworn in as first-ever Filipino American elected to the state Legislature

More than 300 community members attended the historic inauguration of Assemblyman Steven Raga as the first Filipino American elected to office in New York state.

Many who attended the swearing-in event at the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows Corona Park wore traditional and cultural attire to the event at the building that once housed the General Assembly of the newly formed United Nations from 1946-50 until its current home in Manhattan became available for the world body.