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Nine story office/commercial building to go up at 38-01 Queens Boulevard

Rendering (source: WSJ)

Rendering 38-01 Queens Blvd (source: WSJ)

May 2, 2016 Staff Report

Two real estate companies have teamed up to build a nine-story, mixed use building at 38-01 Queens Boulevard, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Curbcut Urban Partners LLC and Platinum Realty Associates have unveiled renderings for a 146,000-square-foot, glass-and steel building that will target medical, nonprofit and community service tenants that are increasingly looking to the outer boroughs in search of affordable office space, according to the WSJ.

While the property will house general office and retail space, zoning rules require a significant portion of the property be used for community services, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The building will feature multiple, separate lobbies, entrances and elevators to appeal to a varied tenant base, according to Curbcut CEO Aaron Malinsky, and will also have a rooftop deck and outdoor terraces.

The property was purchased for $12,070,000 by Curbcut in December and demolition plans were filed with the Department of Buildings in January, the Sunnysidepost reported at the time.

The property is currently zoned for light manufacturing (M1-4), although retail, office and hotels are permitted to be built on the site. Residential is not permitted.

38-01 Queens Blvd (Sunnysidepost)

38-01 Queens Blvd (Sunnysidepost)

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36 Comments

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Joel

33rd Street and 40th Street Stations are actually the perfect stations for mid-rise office buildings. While the 7 is over capacity heading towards the city in the morning and towards Flushing in the evening, it is well under capacity in the opposite direction. On top of that, the off peak direction gets twice as many trains. The chance of this building or any others built here attracting additional peak direction riders is minimal. It will attract peak direction workers who were going to be working in the city anyways and reverse commuters.

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OldenDays

excellent point. i was thinking this but couldn’t articulate it. people commuting from LIC or northern brooklyn to this building will not be any kind of issue for train capacity. if anything we need MORE offices that are outside of manhattan…downtown brooklyn, LIC, flushing, jamaica, etc. i watch so many empty 7 trains heading out to flushing in the morning.

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Scoler

I saw one train headed to Flushing that was almost empty except for Rikki, doing her oh-so-clever reverse commute to Jamaica.

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Guy with a regular NYC commute

Ha! Every morning now I’m going to be looking for Rikki on the opposite platform.

OldenDays

i’m no fan of overdevelopment in general, but i welcome the offices and commercial properties to this area of the LIC/Sunnyside border. LIC can have their 50 story residential condo towers. sunnyside is already dense with residences but what we don’t have a lot of these days is local jobs. plus that area has very low foot traffic to support local businesses. a lot of buildings on the LIC/Sunnyside border are turning into offices and that’s great because it provides more local jobs and more customers for other businesses like delis and restaurants in both LIC and Sunnyside. plus it’s a great place for businesses because of all the transportation options, but it’s not such a great place for residences because of the trainyards and warehouses and such. so this seems like a really good use of space.

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sunnyside S.O.B.

keep the gentrification coming,… better neighborhood, higher property values, cool cafes, more young people…. and less lowlifes and masterbating mta riders.

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Anonymous

I heard that the original intention of this decades-long effort to rezone was to attract businesses to LIC. That was an admirable goal. But, I heard, no one wanted to put offices there, they wanted to put residences. I’m glad someone is bringing a building that will put people to work. People need good, skilled jobs. They had better use union labor to build it and union labor to run and clean it or there will be an uproar so loud the owners will have to get earplugs to save themselves from permanent deafness.

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Anonomus

There is no way for that building to survive financially if they use union wages to build it and union wages to run it. The unions are out of control. Before the “old guard” starts complaining………,my father was a union mason for 40 years. Even he says the unions are destroying this country. They started out for the right reason and then got out of control like everything else

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Mac

-Anonomous You and your father sound like two Fox News watching idiots who have allowed the topic of the “economy” to be turned into a two dimensional equation. Right to Work states are: Alabama,Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas,Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. (Wisconsin, Michigan and Indiana just recently added to the list)The worst crime in the nation according to FBI statistics are Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas and South Carolina. All Right to work states. “All”. Pew Economic Mobility Project, a non-profit, non-partisan research organization, released a report on May 5,2013, on upward mobility. The 9 Worst States:Alabama, Florida, Kentucky,Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina,Oklahoma,South Carolina,Texas. All Right to work for “less” states. According to US census data the 10 poorest states : Mississippi, Arkansas, West Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, Montana, Kentucky, Alabama, North Carolina and Louisiana. They all have common denominator of being “Red States”. Seven of the the ten are RTW states and that ratio even worsens when you go up to the poorest 25 states in the union. A policy of low wages in a country with a progressive income tax system is a recipe for disaster for the country.
Lower Wages and Incomes
1.The average worker in states with right to work laws makes $5,971 (12.2 percent) less annually than workers in states without right to when all other factors are removed than workers in other states.
2.Median household income in states with these laws is $6,568 (11.8 percent) less than in other states ($49,220 vs. $55,788).
3 In states with right to work laws, 25.9 percent of jobs are in low-wage occupations, compared with 18.0 percent of jobs in other states.
According to Forbes Magazine a Republican Contributor the 10 richest states by median household income Maryland , Connecticut, New Jersey. New Hampshire, Alaska, Massachusetts, Virginia ,Hawaii, Delaware and California. Unions help stimulate commerce and economic growth for all participants in a market economy. Facts and statistics prove this point. “Right to work” anti union legislation keeps people poor and hurts the economy. Fact. This is much more than the two dimensional equation that you and your father buy from Fox News and ignorantly tout. The economy, business, salaries and labor are much more complex then the “low wages” and cost argument you and your father tout. Get informed blowhard. Uninformed voters like you and your father are hurting this country.

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Joe at the Berkley

Hey Anonomus, It’s thinking or the lack of thinking like yours and your fathers that has gotten us 14 million illegal alien laborers, millions of jobs offshored and 2 million foreign nationals working here on various types of visas. The quest for cheap and free laborer has ripped this country apart once it looks like it’s poised to do it again. Congratulations you are officially a gullible fool.

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Flores 360

Anti-development nuts you say? Here it goes!… Since this building is being built a block away from the Sunnyside-Long Island City border on 39 Street, the gentrification level will definitely increase. Even though the development is not residential, businesses that live very close to the site will ultimately suffer, knowing the fact that pricier businesses will likely move in, thus increasing land value. Hopefully this information is enough for you. Enjoy!

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easy going

it will be a pleasure to look at this nice build from the 7 train instead of those disgusting roofs of buildings with all the graffiti

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Neziah Bliss

First four comments are thoughtful and positive. I expect an onslaught of negativity to come crashing down any moment.

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Del Toro

People will complain about developments like this, they are stuck back in 70’s they don’t want anything that will inconvenience them, they are selfish they are narcissists, then they’ll claim millenials are narcissists. Check the replies to positive comments above, you get the idea.

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Del Toro

Looks great, the area has been suffering badly, there is not much foot traffic since there is no residential housing on that side. With some nice stores, restaurants and hopefully better GYM with a garage, it will be a great spot in the neighborhood. If Forest Hills can get nice shops and stores, why can’t Sunnyside?

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Sunnyside Local

We had nice shops, restaurants and movie theatre before the gentrification started. Now we have empty storefronts and a real estate market that is trying to flip properties for profit instead of developing them.

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Angela

-Sunnyside Local Dazies, Mario’s, Salt and Fat, Venturos, Quant, Dog and Duck, Side Tracks, Rumanian Garden and Turkish Grill are all nice restaurants.. I have lived in Sunnysude 55 years and think the term gentrification is being used out of context. Sunnyside as a neighborhood never really had a down turn and has always been stable. Examples of ugly new construction in Sunnyside: that multi colored brick building on 43rd street between Skillman and 43rd Aves., the t-mobile building and that dump on 48th street and 43rd avenue. For real eye sores in the area but not in Sunnyside just drive down Jackson Ave and into Brooklyn. Ugly….

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Sunnyside Local

Absolutely the are Angela. But bottom line, five years ago we had a much more comprehensive neighborhood. Center Cinemas, April Glass, King Boulevard, Horgan’s, Bliss, Murphy’s, Meat Boutique and countless other businesses have been forced out because of rising rents. Those rent increases weren’t the result of market economics. They were the result of a few property owners getting together, forming a Business Improvement District and then marketing the neighborhood through the real estate sections of the local papers as the next big thing…and then selling their properties at the artificially inflated rates. A few individuals chose the direction of the neighborhood. Not the Community Board. Not the residents. To me that’s the definition of gentrification.

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Urbo

not all of those places closed because of rising rents. seeing as how sunnyside is largely comprised of rental properties, and some of them are still rent stabilized, means that landlords can’t get TOO greedy because there is someone controlling them, granted this is from a housing perspective and not necessarily having to do with businesses, but out of the ones you listed: Meat Boutique never really even started up to begin with, they invested in the exterior but had a small selection, the movie theater was great if you wanted a bargain from time to time but it always smelled and always sucked a bit for as long as I can remember. Kings Boulevard was a great spot in the early 90’s for men’s clothing and shoes but it unfortunately remained just that well into the aughts. I see the point that you’re making but we can’t always turn around and shake our fists at landlords like they’re all backed by corporate giants (which as we all know, with the movie theater and the adjacent property, is indeed the case)

Angela

-urbo King Blvd was a men’s store located on 48th street and Greenpoint Ave. for decades and was put out of business by a landlord who sold the property to developers. There is no commercial rent control in NY.

South

Unfortunately we can gripe, gripe, gripe about the loss of a movie theater, and meat boutique etc, but the reason they are not in business any longer is not exclusively because of higher rents, but also because we all chose each and every day to not support them them – for one reason or another. Maybe we just picked up all of our groceries at Key Food and didn’t want to make the extra stop, or we decided to see an earlier showing of a movie at a different theater – we’re all responsible. It’s hugely frustrating to read everyone (and this is not directed at your post, which isn’t entirely wrong.) moaning about gentrification, and failing businesses, without realizing that we as a community are just as responsible for both the negative and positive changes to our neighborhood. Rents are high, but until we all decide to support our local businesses we can’t keep repeating the same blank rhetoric that fully scapegoats the “rising rents” and “greedy”.

Northsider

We never had nice whole and let’s be honest.. We loved the movie theater, but it was a $hithole.

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Angela

-northsider The site of the Johavah Witness hall was once a magnificent theatre the old Center was never one of the higher grade movie theatres even when it was a single theatre. At least the Center was a step up from Delux in Woodside. Good times were had in all.

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Anonymous

The Sunnyside Movie Theater on 51st and Roosevelt was a palace. Look it up in old pictures. How the low-grade but steadfast Center survived while the Sunnyside died in the ’60s is beyond me.

Anonymous

Your name sure suits you. P.S. Rich men are sexual predators, too. That disease can’t count the money in your pocket.

Del Toro

Nice shops? Can you give some examples of nice shops that drove business to sunnyside? Movie theater? You mean the place infested with bedbugs, roaches, gums on seats, disgusting smelly place? There is a reason that place closed, and now there is nothing in it’s place. Why don’t you complain about movie studios that keep stores empty so they can shoot commercials?
You want to live in old places with no access to good quality stores, maybe you can move to Metropolitan Ave.

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Moved here 2 years ago

Sounds like a great development of the property—and not a hotel, so the folks here who jump on that can go right to worrying about our future and current infrastructure needs.

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Angela

The rendering actually looks pretty nice. Bright, fresh, airy and aesthetically appealing. Much nicer than much of the new construction going up in the area, I wonder what that idiot Irish Lassie thinks?

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Sunnyside Local

I see a lot of empty buildings in Sunnyside, not new construction. You’re right though,it is decent design.

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David

-Sunnyside Local 38-01 Queens Blvd is actually LIC zip code 11101, not in Sunnyside..

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