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New York State Lawmakers Pass Bill to Repeal 50-A Law That Conceals Police Records

Photo: Unsplash @JulianWan

June 10, 2020 By Allie Griffin

New York state lawmakers passed a bill yesterday to repeal a law that cloaks police records in secrecy.

The lawmakers overwhelming voted in favor of the bill to repeal the law known as 50-A, as calls for police reforms are sweeping the nation. The bill disbands the decades-old law that seals police officers’ personnel records from public viewing.

The NYPD has been accused of using 50-A to hide the disciplinary and misconduct records of its officers from the public. The old law states that performance records of police officers, firefighters and correction officers are “confidential and not subject to inspection or review.”

Police reform advocates have been pushing for its repeal for years to improve transparency and accountability inside the NYPD. The protests in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd pushed the vote forward.


The bill passed with a 40-22 vote in the senate and a 101-43 vote in the assembly.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has said he supports the repeal of 50-A and will sign the bill into law this week.

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Politicians records

is about what they did while in the office, what they support and signed into law. But while you are at it, what did Nancy and Joe do over decades except serve their own pockets using the “oppressed” for their political agenda and power. Go ahead and label as you were brainwashed to do by radicals – communists, fascists or any other extremists . Now explain how 2+2=5

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Why is Trump afraid to release his tax returns?

Agreed, you care about what Trump’s hiding too right?

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Agreed, what is Pelosi and Biden record?

What did they do while “serving” the public being in office for decades? What is their political agenda history, net worth before and after they entered office? Biden in office for over 40 years, Pelosi over 30 years, talk about systemic

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Donald J Trump

My tax returns are currently under audit from the IRS…will gladly release them after the audit is complete…cannot release them and undermine an ongoing investigation…see you at the inauguration!!…and thanks again looters and rioters!! couldn’t have had a better scenario of mutts burning down cities in the battleground rust belt states….what a godsend!! Thanks!!

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That is completely false. The IRS said in 2016 that Trump can release his taxes in 2016

Trump lovers are ACTUALLY this gullible 😂

The “audit” (that’s been going on for 4 years 🤔) has nothing to do with it, he is free to release them at any time, including in 2016. The IRS has said this over and over again.

You just keep believing the lie. Bigly Sad!

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Peter

Income taxes are unconstitutional. I know plenty of people who just don’t pay because it can’t be enforced.

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ABoondy

wow, looks like we will soon have no cops left after all of this. does this mean that anyone can murder as many as they want and get away with it? LOL asking for a friend.

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They are protesting police murdering George Floyd by kneeling on his neck for 9 minutes while he screamed "I can't breathe"

You just summed up the MOST nuanced understanding of the situation Trump lovers can understand 😂

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Why is Trump afraid to release his tax returns?

Agreed, if stuff like this was codified in law it would be better for transparency.

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