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New York Schools Will Remain Closed Through End of Academic Year: Cuomo

Governor Cuomo announced that all schools in the state will remain closed for the remainder of the academic year (Darren McGee/ Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo)

May 1, 2020 By Allie Griffin

All New York school and college buildings will remain closed through the end of the academic year, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced today.

Cuomo made the announcement weeks after Mayor Bill de Blasio said New York City public schools will stay closed through the end of the term.

The two lawmakers have butted heads over the issue of who has the authority to close and reopen schools since the coronavirus pandemic took hold of New York City.

Cuomo said the mayor didn’t have the authority to keep city school facilities shuttered hours after de Blasio made the call on April 11.

“He didn’t close them, and he can’t open them,” Cuomo said at the time.

De Blasio held his ground and said all schools must remain closed for the safety of students and teachers. Cuomo finally agreed.

“We’re going to have the schools remained closed for the rest of the year,” Cuomo said at an Albany press briefing today. “We’re going to continue the distance learning programs.”

Cuomo added that he’ll decide if summer school will be in-person or online by the end of the month.

Catholic schools within New York City, including Brooklyn and Queens, will also remain closed under Cuomo’s order.

“We just learned of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s decision that all elementary and secondary schools shall remain closed for the duration of the current 2019-2020 school year, as New York continues efforts to prevent the spread of Coronavirus,” Dr. Thomas Chadzutko, Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Brooklyn, said in a statement.

“As such, the Catholic academies and parish schools within the Diocese of Brooklyn, which includes Queens, will remain closed through the end of June.”

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34 Comments

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@LIC Direct...

That Charter school you mention does not take behavior troubled children as a whole. They are on a lottery/acceptance only. You can’t just walk in and enroll your kids into the school!
They also have the ability to kick your kid out of the school if he or she acts out and you can’t or won’t come to collect them within a half hour of them calling you.
And should the disruptive behavior continue on other iccasions, they will kick your child out. THAT’S is why their success rate is so high. Parent engagement (not ENRagement as per what public schools have to put up with), parent care and interest and student attention to detail and willingness to learn.

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Man up

Hey Jerry, you’re quite obsessed. What exactly have you done for our neighborhood, besides whine online under a fake name? Talk is cheap, like the rent in your mom’s basement.

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LIC Direct

Charter School Success Academy in Harlem thier 12th grade graduating class just got their college acceptance letters the majority heading to college. Many to Ivies and private colleges all minority, black and hispanic students from low income homes. One thing in common was the expectation of excellance, parent participation and accountability. Recieving less money per pupil than your regular Public school student.

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Gardens Watcher

Good move to close the schools, especially now that there are reports out of Mt. Sinai of new, strange Covid-19 symptoms in kids. Too much is still unknown about this virus.

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Mac

@Hastagger- He couldn’t care less than the orange dotard. Still need help with distinguishing propaganda from fact?

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Mac

No Heather you give me a break. The districts that are failing are the same ones that were failing in the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and so on. The list is always East New York Brownsville, Bushwick, South Jamaica, Upper Manhattan, St. George Stapleton, SI and huge swath of the Bronx. North Eastern Queens, Crntral Eastern Queens, Tottenville SI, BX and Southern Brooklyn all have performance records that rival wealthy US suburban districts. The article you provided never gave a list of the all of the schools that participated in the study ( it did mention 2 by name and were known struggling schools in poorer districts) however did say several times through out the very short article 90% of students failed. Obviously an article to incite and manipulate. That’s the Post. These failed school districts have been failing for generation after generation because of circumstances in the home life of these students. The problem is not at the school level but at the students home life.You could she’ll out $100K per year perstudent in these districts without family support you will continue to get results mentioned in your Post article.

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#kingcuomo

King Cuomo has no empathy: not for the people out of work or the people who died in the nursing homes. He could not care less.

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Ximena Torres

Thank you Mr governor for free computer. Now all my 5 children have. But why no pay for internet? I need upgrade for wifi with 5 computer.

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that was the chancellor and mayor.

and they are not free, nor are they gifted. these are loaned to you. you must return them. I hope whomever assigned your computer to you took your correct information. they will come knocking on your door if it is not returned.

the internet isn’t free either.

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Heather

Mac-Give me a break! No matter how much money gets flushed into the NYC public education, the performance by the students in too many districts remains dismal. There are well over 100 public schools with classes showing a 90 percent failure rate on state exams in both math and English. How bad does a school have to be when you can only get ten percent of the kids to pass the most fundamental subjects? It’s depressing to be sure, but perhaps not so shocking. This is not a new problem for New York City schools. I do not care about the elite. I carry about the rest of us.

https://nypost.com/2019/12/17/over-140-nyc-schools-have-grades-with-90-percent-state-exam-failure-rate/

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NO HEATHER, YOU GIVE US A BREAK!

The tests are asinine and no one will dispute that. There is more to education than that. There is something called a CURRICULUM for each subject within each grade, including three and prek that we MUST adhere to. And lets not forget the children’s first teachers… THEIR PARENTS/WHOMEVER THEY LIVE WITH MOSTLY!!! Many of our students who constantly and consistently fail go home to people who don’t give a crap and are actually PAID to not give a crap! Ive been told by my second graders that their parents told them not to worry about getting good grades because they can always GO ON PUBLIC ASSISTANCE when they grow up! who says that to a child?
The main problems with the math and science tests is that they are written by people who are 1: not educators. 2: not New Yorkers and 3: living in a dream world. They have no idea about what students’ lives are like within this city. they automatically think everyone has internet access, multiple laptops/ipads/whatever and scanners/printers.

perhaps the city wouldn’t have to pour more and more money into the system if people would just help contribute. stop raising hoodlums. DO SOMETHING!

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Vera

I live in Sunnyside. I wish I had a house in the Hamptoms to get away from here. Most of us would do the same. Queens is very depressing and unsafe right now. We all are at risk. All of us, in such a small space, appear to have helped the virus spread rapidly through packed subway trains, busy playgrounds and hivelike apartment buildings, forming ever-widening circles of infections. NYC is the nation’s epicenter of the virus.

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Jasvinder

Those over 16 can apply for a work permit. Have them clean check out counters and bag items at grocery stores and pharmacies. I heard key food and cvs are hiring. $15 an hour.

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Mac

Heather – You May want to research your “bandwagon” view” on public education. The last two or three generation of public school alumni have created more millionaires and even billionaires before the alumni hit 30 than any other generation before them. Look it up

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Or she can come to my classroom and see how : teach

I teach my students how to think. NOT WHAT, HOW.

I also teach that in order to accept history you have to understand the times back then. Little tidbits behind why things happened.

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Alexis

Glad schools are closed. I was worried he gonna protect them the same way he protected the older people at nursing homes.

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Nessa

I wonder how many teachers will show up to teach in the Fall 🤔. I am sure they will demand PPE and daily classroom sanitizing. I am sure older students will demand the same.

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Shannon

So there are a bunch of teenagers hanging out, smoking, blasting music and cursing in my neighbors bark yard. I understand I was there age once also. But I hope this does not become a daily gathering with the weather getting warmer. Our yards are not fenced and I am keeping my young children away from the yard. I will have to call 311 if they do this again. I tried talking to my neighbor about it nicely but she said “Well, kids will be kids, so what can you do?” and hung up the phone.

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Why is this written on here? You're blaming the school buildings being closed ???

Blame who is responsible for hoodlum behavior: PARENTS!

They probably told you kids will be kids because you and your other neighbors are calling them when you ought to be calling your neighbors or your local police station.

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Just so that you all know...

The spring break we never got, almost killed the teachers. And we still have two months to go!

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Isa

I commend the governor for making this decision! Trying to reopen schools in this still chaotic environment is too much!

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Jayla

The school yr damn near over anyway it’s may 🤣ain’t nobody goin back to School anyway🥱

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#wheresjimmy

Little jimmy is hiding
King Cuomo has spoken
The serfs must listen
Will he open schools in September or will parents who still have jobs be forced to stay home ?

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Jerry

Can I ask a question? Where are our leaders during this crisis? Where is Jimmy Van Bramer, Pat Dorfman, Dorothy Morehead, Rick Duro. Where are these people when we need their leadership? These people are always writing in talking about bicycle lanes, dog parks, bicycle lanes for dogs, etc, etc, etc. we need you! Come back to SUNNYSIDE from your homes in the Hamptons. Please.

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Beth

Why not extend the school year until August online. Or hire virtual babysitters for the public to use for free.

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Joe Biden's neurologist

Finally, the teachers get some paid time off! The poor dears!

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Debra

What do we call the generation after millennials?
Quarantinians? Lockdownians?

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Heather

Public education is trash anyways. We learn that Christopher Columbus was a good guy. Your kids are being brainwashed. Better to home-school them.

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holly

Coumo is a multi-millionaire, still receives a paycheck, knows where his next meal is coming from, has zero financial insecurity,.. but yet continues to say “we are all in this together”. The arrogance!!!

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