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New York Joins Six State Effort to Reopen Economies

Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a press briefing in Albany today

April 13, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Six states — New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Rhode Island — will launch a cooperative effort to reopen their economies, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced today.

Each state will name a public health official, an economic development official and a chief of staff member that will form a working group to develop a reopening plan, Cuomo said.

He said they will “start work immediately” to develop strategies to ease restrictions that have halted normal life for residents.

“The state boundaries mean very little to this virus,” Cuomo said.

The six-state panel will evaluate public health research, economic reactivation issues, hard data and the experience of other countries to create a set of guidelines.

Each state may not have the same exact reopening plan and dates as they each have their own individual circumstances, but Cuomo said he hopes the plans are as coordinated as possible.

“I don’t believe we wind up with a fully common strategy,” Cuomo said. “You have different states in different positions.”

Many of the six states — including New York, New Jersey and Connecticut — formed a coalition in announcing business shutdowns last month.

“We started this journey together, we’re going to end this journey together,” Cuomo said.

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14 Comments

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Joy

Carol, Take your own advice and go be Trumps, Cuomo’s and De Balsio’s guinea pig and head back to work as soon as possible. No one said you can’t. They will need you to in order to monitor the pandemic and be another statistic while we wait for a vaccine. It’s incredible how the governors demeanor changed so quickly now that opening business is on the table. Speak to a healthcare worker that trusts you enough to tell it like it is. Hope it works out for you.

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Joy

Carol, As a matter of fact, go work for free since you get such a passionate sense of purpose and satisfaction out of working. Try volunteering at a city or hotel shelter. According to the mayor, you can also sleep in one of them and get meals for free during your long stay. Go preach to the thousands of sick, mentally ill, druggies, unemployed with benefits and struggling working class about how wrong it is that they are choosing to shelter in place and that they should get ready to work for minimum wage during this pandemic. Do you not watch what is happening to our essential workers like healthcare workers, police, MTA staff, postal and delivery workers for being out in public? Many are getting sick and demanding better precautions. Some are even threatening strikes and walk outs. Like I said, i paid my dues to society and so has my husband. What I choose to do with my free time is my business and not yours. God Bless America.

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Jessica

No one knows how long this will last. People in South Korea that recovered from coronavirus are now testing positive weeks later after testing negative. Proper face masks are not available to the public. If you live with others you run the risk of getting infected and bringing the virus home if you go to work and can’t work from home. Studies estimate that 25% to 50% of infected people are not showing symptoms. Its time that the public make educated choices about their own lives. health and risks. No one is going to dictate when it is best for me to go back to work. I rather be alive to fight the system than end up in a coffin. We need to vote for people like AOC that are representing the poor and working class.

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Carol

Not everyone has the luxury of working from home, Jessica. Remember the more people who are kept out of the workforce are people who are not paying taxes. Our taxes are what helps pay for social programs that help the poor. Our taxes pay for food stamps, Medicaid, welfare. With fewer taxes being collected these programs that help the poor are going to suffer. There’s no question about it. You may want to stay home; that’s your decision but remember it’s workers who pay necessary taxes. Who do you think is going to pay for all of AOL’s freebies?

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Joy

Carol, so back to work! No one is stopping you. Go apply at a market or something since you define working as a sense of purpose in your life. The virus is in the air sweetie. You can catch it just by someone infected breathing, talking and laughing 13 feet away from you. Good luck riding mass transit and walking the streets. I will stay home and watch my soaps and spend time with my family..while you house, feed and pay everyone else’s bills. I earned my retirement check!

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Carol

Your postings are so sad, “sweetie”. Any excuse not to contribute, eh? Do you not go to the market for groceries; if so, you are breathing air that might be contaminated. You stay home, watch your soaps and never get close to another human being in your life (other than your family). Again, I’m sure the rest of the world will not notice or care that you are no longer among them. You are a pitiful excuse for a human being.

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Gardens Watcher

Guadalupe, a vaccine won’t be widely available for at least 12-18 months. Masks are available and you can make your own. Various tests are ramping up, so that will make a difference.

Unemployment benefits aren’t going to last forever. Stay safe and healthy.

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Joy

Can they stop interrupting our soaps during his press conferences. He just repeats the same thing everyday. No one that I know is eager or willing to go back to work. Unless its another stimulus check most people do not care.

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Carol

Joy: No one you know is willing to go back to work…..and you complain about your soaps being interrupted? Most people are responsible and like being able to pay their bills. Most people get a sense of purpose and satisfaction out of working. You, obviously, do not, so just enjoy your stimulus money and sit lazily on your couch enjoying your soaps. The world won’t miss you.

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Christina Traboulsy

Return to work immediately. What about schools? I would like to know how they’re going to organize this do they need any help I can volunteer my services to be in authority well actually I’m only joking I’m disabled right now and probably for the rest of my life but as I speak I am living in an adult home and unable to leave the room because we had three covid-19 patients as residents also and one of them has died. The workers here and the residents are somewhat like living on the edge because we have two people here that are being traded with medication after they returned out of the emergency room for the covid-19 virus. The sounds wonderful to me and I hope all works out and I say this in the name of my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ amen

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Guadalupe

I still can’t get tested and find a proper face mask and people are talking about going back to work. No thank you. My unemployment benefits are on the way and i can’t get evicted. I will be fine staying home until there is a vaccine.

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Gardens Watcher

NY, NJ and CT need to work together as a team to plan the Tri-State recovery strategy. Mayor de Blasio may be correct that school buildings should remain closed for the rest of the school year, but he was out of line to announce that on his own.

They better have a plan to sanitize the buildings, and a new course now teaching kids about personal hygiene.

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