You are reading

New York City Will Have Curfew Beginning at 11 p.m., Governor and Mayor Announce

A burnt NYPD vehicle remains on a Manhattan street after New Yorkers protested the death of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer (Wikimedia Commons/ BlaueBlüte / CC0)

Jun. 1, 2020 By Allie Griffin

New York City residents will have be to be home by 11 p.m. tonight, as the governor and mayor announced a curfew following a series of violent incidents and looting at protests over the weekend.

The leaders want the streets of New York City to be cleared from 11 p.m. through 5 a.m. The curfew will just be tonight and it will be re-evaluated Tuesday.

“Tonight, to protect against violence and property damage, the Governor and I have decided to implement a citywide curfew,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement.

De Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo decided to impose a curfew following looting and a number of violent incidents–such as a Molotov cocktail being thrown threw a police car window.

“The violence and the looting that has gone on in New York City has been bad for the city, the state and this entire national movement,” Cuomo said in a statement. “While we encourage people to protest peacefully and make their voices heard, safety of the general public is paramount and cannot be compromised.”

Cuomo also warned of coronavirus spreading among the thousands of protesters gathering together.

“At the same time, we are in the midst of a global pandemic which spreads through crowds and threatens public health,” he said. “Tonight the Mayor and I are implementing a citywide curfew starting at 11 p.m. and we are doubling the NYPD presence across the city.”

The NYPD will boost its presence from 4,000 officers to 8,000 officers to prevent violence and property damage, Cuomo said in a radio interview earlier in the day.

The additional officers will be deployed to parts of lower Manhattan and Downtown Brooklyn, areas that have been hit by looters.

Several cities across the nation have already put curfews into effect as large protests and riots have swept across the U.S.

email the author: [email protected]

6 Comments

Click for Comments 
Dave

The Democrat politicians are now hand in glove with the thugs and looters who do what ever they want.

531
Reply
Kneeling on someone's neck while they scream "I can 't breath" until they're dead is bad

The Trump lovers want to shift the discussion to how much the looters are costing Gucci’s insurance company

17
7
Reply
ABoondy

what we need is a real cop, like robocop. someone who isnt afraid to use lethal force.

Reply
ChangeGuyMissesPlasticBags

Even the homeless have to be home by 11 PM? That’s real chaaaaange!

350
Reply
Give me Air Jordans or give me death

So just be sure to get your looting and vandalizing done early and all will be cool.

564
7
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

Jan. 27, 2023 By Bill Parry

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.