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Nearly 2,000 Queens Residents Have Died from the Coronavirus

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April 13, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Nearly 2,000 Queens residents have died from the novel coronavirus, according to new data.

The borough continues to be the hardest hit by the deadly virus — 1,994 residents have died and 32,749 residents have contracted the disease, as of 5 p.m. yesterday.

Queens has more deaths and more positive cases than any other borough. Citywide, 6,182 New Yorkers have died and 104,410 New Yorkers have been infected with COVID-19.

The greater Elmhurst area has been called the “epicenter of the epicenter” of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S. The number of cases there continues to rise, the data shows.

Corona has continuously had the largest share of residents with the virus. As of 5 p.m. yesterday, 2,398 residents tested positive for COVID-19. Elmhurst had 1,859 positive cases; Jackson Heights had 1,428; East Elmhurst had 1,716 cases; and Woodside had 1,152 cases.

Not far off, Ridgewood and Glendale, which share one zip code, had 1,066 cases together.

In Southeast Queens, Jamaica had 1,060 cases and Far Rockaway had 1,111 cases.

Many of the hardest hit neighborhoods are low income areas with large Hispanic and Black populations. Hispanic and Black New Yorkers in New York City are dying at twice the rate of white New Yorkers due to the coronavirus, according to health department data.

Elsewhere, hundreds of people have tested positive cases in several Queens neighborhoods.

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5 Comments

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Gardens Watcher

Suckafree, are you kidding? Not only are people traveling to other neighborhoods and boroughs to buy groceries (via public & private transportation), but for some it is the only safe way to shop. Aisles in most Queens’ stores are not wide enough to do social distancing.

Add to that the personal shoppers who are traveling wherever they can find what their customers want — from NYC to Nassau or Suffolk and back.

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Suckafree

Sarah, I highly doubt those in any neighborhood would trek to another neighborhood just to buy groceries and other purchases. You last sentence makes no sense. Are you on drugs or drunk when you posted?

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Alice

Instead of making it a race issue focus on ethnicity and culture norms and practices. Focus on what certain groups typically eat and drink. For ex., cooking at home vs. eating fast food. Mediterranean vs. Soul food. Big and beautiful trends vs. Dieting. There are so many ways of looking at this. Smoking and drinking- beer vs. wine. Listening to doctors and health experts about changing lifestyles and behaviors vs. not. This will give the public more answers to what is happening. Its is not just about being poor. Some of the longest living people throughout the world live such simple lives and just live longer by eating better and exercising daily by walking.

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Sarah

Ban all non essential travel. Data like this will only increase the infection rate by having others shop and visit less infected zip codes. Its like the only thing that will make our officials happy is to infect neighborhoods with less non whites and less people on public assistance programs.

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