You are reading

More Queens Streets Will Be Made Car-Free as Part of City’s Open Streets Initiative

Queens Council Member Daniel Dromm and DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg at 34th Avenue in Jackson Heights, which is part of the open streets initiative (DOT Twitter)

May 22, 2020 By Allie Griffin

More Queens streets will be turned over to pedestrians and cyclists beginning tomorrow, as the city expands its open streets initiative during the coronavirus pandemic.

The new streets announced today put New York City above its goal of closing 40 miles to car traffic by the end of May, Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

“New Yorkers deserve space to safely enjoy the outdoors in their own neighborhoods,” de Blasio said in a statement. “Thanks to hard work from a host of City agencies, we’ve beaten our Open Streets goal for this month – and made our city a national leader in expanding public space as we fight COVID-19.”

Over the course of the month, the city has rolled out multiple waves of street openings as part of the initiative, first announced on April 27.

De Blasio hopes to open 100 miles of city streets for pedestrian and cyclists’ exclusive use over the course of the pandemic.

All open street locations can be found on the Department of Transportation website.

The purpose is to provide more outdoor space for New Yorkers looking to get some fresh air amid stay-at-home orders. The additional mileage of open space will make it easier for people to follow social distancing rules as they venture outside to enjoy the warm weather.

Several streets in Queens were announced today and will close to traffic daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. beginning tomorrow.

The streets include:

120th Street between 94th Avenue and Liberty Avenue in South Richmond Hill

99th Street between Horace Harding and 66th Avenue in Rego Park

50th Avenue between 48th Street and 44th Street in Sunnyside

66th Road between 110th Street and Grand Central Parkway in Forest Hills

Ascan Avenue between Queens Boulevard and Austin Street in Forest Hills

60th Street between Laurel Hill Boulevard and 47th Avenue in Maspeth

107th Avenue between 159th Street and 160th Street in Jamaica

108th Avenue between 159th Street and 160th Street in Jamaica

159th Street between 108th Avenue and 109th Avenue in Jamaica

109th Avenue between 159th Street and 160th Street in Jamaica

Officers from local police precincts will monitor the open streets.

Several streets adjacent to Queens parks will also close to traffic, beginning tomorrow including:

Center Boulevard between 57th Avenue and Borden Avenue near Hunters Point Park in Long Island City

169th Street between Northern Boulevard and 43rd Avenue near Plaut Triangle in Flushing

85th Street between 25th Avenue and 30th Avenue near Gorman Playground in East Elmhurst

68th Road between 108th Street and Yellowstone Boulevard near Yellowstone Park in Forest Hills

Dieterle Crescent between Alderton Street and 65th Drive near Painter’s Playground in Rego Park

Barron Street between 116th Avenue and Foch Boulevard near Baisley Pond Park in Jamaica

Lakeview Boulevard East between 118th Avenue and 122nd Avenue near Baisley Pond Park in Jamaica

155th Street between 119th Avenue and 125th Avenue near Baisley Pond Park in Jamaica

Lakeview Lane between 122nd Avenue and Baisley Boulevard near Baisley Pond Park in Jamaica

122nd Avenue between Lakeview Boulevard East and Lakeview Lane near Baisley Pond Park in Jamaica

 

email the author: [email protected]

28 Comments

Click for Comments 
Yoga for the homeless

A lot of the cars on the streets will be pulling U-Haul trailers as the smart people get the geck out. Traffic won’t be much of an issue in a few years.

Reply
gag

The only issue with building a park over the Sunnyside yards is that decking over a rail yard is super super super expensive. So any park space would have to be subsidized in some way by residential/commercial development.

It’s good that they’re restricting car use since most of the neighborhood doesn’t own a car and it seems like most of the ones that do just leave it on the street perpetually. I’d like to see a lane reduction on Queens Blvd to discourage commuters from Long Island from speeding through our neighborhood. Originally there were trees along the 7 train viaduct (with a sidewalk) when it was initially constructed, but they were ripped out to add a car lane. A single lane reduction from both sides with sidewalk extensions into the parking lane would make the Blvd far nicer and safer.

Reply
mike

Most cyclists are lunatics who dont follow rules
ban them also from these areas

160
5
Reply
Carlos rodriguez

This was a great thing to do, thank you mr.diblassio, mr.dromm, and ms.trottenberg for making it possible, its great for the communities..

4
14
Reply
Mac

Hashtagger as Meg- Just repeating things don’t make them happen or become truth.

3
1
Reply
Sunnyside needs a grass park

Sunnyside is an asphalt desert. We need a park with grass. Cemeteries do not count as green space in my opinion. They are private properties and who wants to sunbath or have a picnic at the cemetery. We should have a grand scale project like Central Park over the Sunnyside Railyards not more skyscrapers to improve the quality of life in the Sunnyside.

16
2
Reply
Linda

The city needs a food drive for people who are in need of food that drive and cant find parking space at food banks.

2
5
Reply
Meg

My boyfriend and I have been out of state for a few weeks. I miss my apartment in Sunnyside! Hopefully things get better soon for you guys! We also want to feel safe to return so we can empty our place and give back our house keys to our landlord.

6
14
Reply
Greta

I have not been to a beauty salon in over three months and I hate going out in public with my hair being a mess and in need of a dye job. My daughter is sending me a wig so i can enjoy the nice weather and open streets. Hopefully I will lose all the extra weight I gained. I also want to look my best once church resumes service.

4
13
Reply
SuperWittySmitty

A cyclist is a disaster for the country’s economy – he does not buy a car, does not buy car insurance, does not buy fuel, does not send his car to service and repair, does not use paid parking services. They don’t cause serious accidents, don’t require highways and interstates, do not become obese.

Healthy people are not needed for economics. They don’t buy drugs, they don’t go to hospitals and doctors. They don’t add anything to the country’s GDP.

In contrast, a new McDonalds creates at least 30 jobs –
10 cardiologists, 10 dentists, 10 weight-loss experts, and the people who actually work at McDonald’s.

Choose wisely: Do we want cyclists or McDonalds? It’s worth thinking about

P.S. walkers are even worse. These people don’t even buy a bike.

6
15
Reply
CeeCee

This is got nothing to do with the virus and everything to do with the green New Deal.

16
7
Reply
Kathy

Nice 🚶 without cat congestion. The Big 🍎 is getting healthy again. Let’s play ⚾ !

5
14
Reply
Michaela

It’s a very rainy day this Saturday so not a great walk day anyway. ☔ I am home cooking the last cup of white rice I have left. Would be nice if the restaurants donated some food to local residents in Queens for Memorial day.

1
12
Reply
Jenn

The city is also thinking of ways trying to get people especially the younger working generation who came to places like Queens due to gentrification and who typically do not own cars to stay by opening streets to pedestrians and cyclists. Many that i know are moving out of this city because they do not want to pay the high rent without the city life they sought after. Banning cars may help the restaurant and bar industry cater to their customers.

2
8
Reply
Trump wiped out the economy

Who can afford a car? Maybe the taxpayer money he’s redistributing and giving away for free will help

27
17
Reply
Cindy

Hopefully they will leave the tamale and flower sellers alone in these areas. Walking opens up your appetite and all street vendors should be considered essential. Some people also eat flowers. Happy memorial day.

9
16
Reply
Talitha

Close a bridge or two to cars and open them to pedestrians and cyclists only.

5
23
Reply
Meridius Latium

The people don’t need permission from tyrants to go back to work. You know the risks, wear a mask and gloves and get on with your lives. Open up yourselves! They can’t arrest everyone especially when they’re outnumbered.

21
15
Reply
Gilligan

Today I saw how some numerous families go outside, always in troop and they really need the whole street to walk together.

Also our 420 friendly and beggars need a place to stay and do their urban stuff.

It would be like 46th block but bigger! I’m eager to stay home and never put a foot overthere.

I can’t believe how inteligent are our elected public servants! Kudos for your supporters!

And I’m happy because my street is not closed.

24
4
Reply
Queens Streets for the Prioritization of Motor Vehicles and Free Parking

Why can’t they do this without menacing senior citizens who need their cars!? Kids shouldn’t be allowed on the roads until they’ve turned 18 and passed their road test. Little Timmy, that scooter may seem fun now, but wait until you’ve got the full power of a V6 at the twitch of an ankle!

10
22
Reply
Rosie O'Donnell' Dietician

Might as well. Pretty soon, nobody will be able to afford a car…

or subway fare,

or a place to live,

or food.

Unless you’re a billionaire or a politician.

27
7
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

Jan. 27, 2023 By Bill Parry

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.