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Mayor Cancels All Large Events in New York City Through End of September

Mayor Bill de Blasio at a June 29 press briefing (Mayoral Photography Office)

July 10, 2020 By Allie Griffin

All large events requiring a city permit are cancelled through the end of September, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Thursday.

De Blasio defined large events as gatherings larger than one city block, and said they would all be cancelled through Sept. 30 due to the coronavirus pandemic. This ban also includes street fairs.

Organizers of events one city block or smaller can still apply for a permit from the city. They must outline their plan to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission and detail cleaning measures with their permit application.

“As New York has begun its reopening process, accessible open spaces are more important than ever,” de Blasio said in a statement. “While it pains me to call off some of the city’s beloved events, our focus now must be the prioritization of city space for public use and the continuation of social distancing.”

In addition, the city will deny permits to any event that interferes with its Open Streets and outdoor dining program, as well as events that takeover too much public park space.

The city will refund or defer all fees already paid for cancelled event permits.

Demonstrations and protests, religious events and press conferences are exempt.

The New York City Marathon, which was scheduled for November 1, has already been cancelled by the city and its organizer New York Road Runners (NYRR).

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20 Comments

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Gardens Watcher

OK Mr. Mayor. While it pains me to agree with this move, I’d also say the campground at City Hall is past it’s expiration date. And the protests have made their point and overstayed their welcome.

Time to do something about that if you’re really concerned about the spread of Covid.

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Free thought

I’ll be having a political party party. It’s the Party political party. Look for the balloons. It’ll be a great time all are invited.

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Cmv

This clown was painting black lives matter on 5th ave with al sharpton.
But all large events are cancelled.

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My Life Matters

Hey my earlier comment Did Not get posited bc I said my life matters too and not just the Blacks . Betcha this wont get posted.

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MUH CONSPIRACY

Oops it did get posted. Did you really say “the Backs?” 😬 You’re right though, your life, like black lives, matter. Thanks for supporting BLM!

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Sue

U can hold any event if you wear a BLM T shirt. Its true and few care. Its sad because someone will eventually come out and say they were allowed to take to increase the spread of covid 19 in that community. Just like the rise in shootings taking place in minority communities.

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4 more years

” Demonstrations and protests, religious events and press conferences are exempt” WTF. i cant host a party for my son that graduated? who took a student load, worked hard. parents who gave up the little luxuries in life like eating out or vacation so we can help him financially. But mean while a bunch can go around pulling the city apart. And guess what. they will be no better off no matter how many statues they pull down or stores they raid. They had 8 years with Obama and if they could not figure it out then, then they never will. But no, they keep on blaming for their short comings. its just easier than actually addressing the real issues.

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Anonymous

Have your party. Just write BLM in the corner of the cake and it’s all good. You’ve got yourself a protest, nice and legal.

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All Lives Matter

But BLM/antifa protests, looting, rioting and statue toppling are not only allowed but encouraged.

The democrats are an utter disgrace.

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My life Matters too

Yes all lives matter . Tired of this BLM nonsense .
Why do we have to yellow paint the BLM on street ? What about the rest of the nation ??
Well what the heck its on street where traffic passes everyday eventually it will fade .Esp when it time to snow all the rock salt will crack it up.

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Agreed, black lives matter

Like you said, all lives matter. Including black ones–so like you said black lives matter. I’m glad you support the cause.

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from May 28 to June 7, there were 2,087 protest-related arrests

That’s what you mean by “allowed?” Is there a single reason to believe your lie?

Thanks for saying that all lives, including black ones, matter. I’m glad you’re against police brutality.

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#wheresjimmy

Most of the rioters were released without charges
Nice that you support violence against the police and citizens

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That's completely false

I posted my stats. You have blind speculation. Most of the rioters were charged.

If you can state a single fact at all, let us know. So far I’m the only one 😂

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Save the Robots

In many cases those who took part in Affirmative Shopping (because raiding high-end stores is SO WOKE) were back on the streets within 6 hours and re-arrested the next day for the same crimes.

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Save the Robots

You’re not allowed to call it looting: It’s known as Affirmative Shopping.

Reply

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