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Long Island City Child Play Space to Close Permanently

City Owlets 10-42 Jackson Avenue (Facebook)

May 4, 2020 By Allie Griffin

A Long Island City children’s play space and cafe is closing permanently after struggling to stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic.

City Owlets play cafe, located at 10-42 Jackson Ave., closed on March 15 and will not reopen when the state permits nonessential businesses to do so.

The owner and founder Linda Nguyen said she has no choice but to permanently close the play cafe because of overhead expenses.

“At the end of the day, we are a small business with ridiculous overhead expenses,” she wrote in an announcement. “Unfortunately, we are not able to sustain operations to re-open and are faced with having to accept permanent closure of our brick and mortar location.”

The cafe, which opened in January 2017, offered a place for children 6 years and older to play, while parents and guardians sipped coffee and tea in the cafe space.

Nguyen called the decision to close “heartbreaking.”

“Like all of you, we wish this pandemic would end and we can return to our prior “normal”, but this is our new heart-breaking reality,” she wrote. “We can only reflect on the memories we’ve shared with all of you in our quaint playcafe and hope that you felt, for a moment in time, we tried our best to package fun and deliver it with love.”

City Owlets will still offer offsite event services for design, staging, catering and entertainment — as well as its classes at schools and daycares, Nguyen said in a statement to customers.

Linda Nguyen, the founder of City Owlets Play Cafe with her family in the space (City Owlets)

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Mac

Hashtagger- You forgot to put worst President in your propaganda post. You live for propaganda. Have you ever posted an original thought?

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Lea

Yes..those that could afford a play space left Queens for the suburbs of LI and other states. I doubt they will be back. The rest of us that stayed cant afford it or will choose to shelter kids at home. You are better off closing for good. There is nothing for inner city children to do around here. Playgrounds are infected with the virus and dog waste. Pools are closed for the summer. No one has a backyard. Its always the poor that suffer. Those with money close as fast as they can to flee and open up in another place or start a new business. Think about opening a nursing home or selling some masks from home.

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#dumpdeblasio

This is terrible – be prepared for more closings of small businesses. Per Cuomo, if you want to reopen, you are “selfish” and you “want to kill people”. New York has one of the worst governor and the absolute WORST MAYOR in the USA. Again, very sad.

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