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Local Sunnyside Pantry Asking For Donations Online

(Photo: Sunnyside Community Services)

Jan. 14, 2021 By Christina Santucci

Sunnyside Community Services (SCS) has launched a food drive for its two pop-up pantries in western Queens.

The food drive is taking place this month and organizers hope to continue the collection through February.

Each week between 400 to 500 families receive groceries from the pantries, which are located in Sunnyside and Woodside, according to SCS.

“The neighborhoods we serve have been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic,” says Judy Zangwill, the executive director of SCS.

Since the pandemic struck in March, SCS has been distributing food and has given out more than 14,000 packages of food to residents in need.

“But there is still so much need and we are asking for the community’s help. Please, if you can afford to do so, donate some food items for our pantry. Even just one or two items would make a big difference for someone who is struggling,” Zangwill says. 

The organizers seek, among other items, canned vegetables, pasta, flour, baking powder, rice, peanut butter, canned or cartons of soup, jars of tomato sauce, cereal, oatmeal, vegetable oil, shelf-stable milk and granola bars. Cornbread, cornmeal and dry or canned lentils and beans will also be accepted.

Donations of non-perishable items can be dropped off at Sunnyside Community Services, located at 43-31 39th Street, on Mondays and Wednesdays from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.

People are also encouraged to donate food items through SCS’ Amazon wishlist. The food will be shipped directly to SCS.

The public is also able to make a monetary donation online by clicking here. For more information or to schedule a drop-off at a different time, email mbova@scsny.org or call 929-335-7800.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

15 Comments

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Lia

It would be even better if they could prepare meals. Maybe hire some unemployed restaurant staff or ask for volunteers. More hungry people would be fed faster this way.

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Goya products never hurt anybody.

People need to stop buying crap they don’t need it but off brand things!!!

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Ann

i don’t understand this. wouldn’t it be much better for people to donate cash so that SCS can buy what they need wholesale? Money would go much further and be spent on exactly what they need.

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Sue

There will basically be a need for most things we give away. Media will claim that people who do not gave pets are lining up at pet pantries to avoid going hungry themselves because food pantries are low.

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Heidi Rojas

So many people and families with children are going to bed hungry every night in our neighborhood. Please donate.

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ABoondy

i find that hard to believe that nobody in their entire family has a job or is not collecting unemployement.

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Luna

What an ignorant comment. People in the neighborhood are hungry!! We need more food and cash!!!

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ABoondy

maybe if supermarkets didnt quadruple their prices, people would be able to afford a can of beans.

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CC

Very true. Everything went up around here. Its like the more food they give away the more supermarket prices go up.

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Sarah

I went to a bakery that i had not gone to since March this week. I paid 5 dollars for a small loaf of olive bread in Astoria. Its ridiculous.

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