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Landmarks Commission to Evaluate Whether to Save Clock Tower; Public Meeting Tomorrow

 

March 23, 2015 By Christian Murray

The first formal step to landmark the Clock Tower will take place tomorrow when the Landmarks Preservation Commission will meet to evaluate whether a public hearing should be held as part of the process to landmark the famous building.

The public meeting tomorrow is significant since it indicates that the Chairperson of the Commission has already reviewed the application and has determined that it has merit and the formal process of whether to landmark it or not should begin.

The Clock Tower, located at 29-29 Queens Blvd., was built in 1927 and was the tallest building in Queens until the construction of the Citigroup building in Court Square. Advocates for the designation argue that it is one of the most significant architectural landmarks in the borough.

Tomorrow, the full commission—comprised of up to 11 Commissioners– will be briefed by LPC’s research group and will vote to determine whether a public hearing should take place—another significant step in the process.

If the majority of Commissioners agree, then a hearing will be scheduled.

At this point, if the owner of the property files a demolition permit with the Department of Buildings, LPC will be notified and it would most likely speed up the review/application process, according to a LPC spokeswoman.

Queens Plaza Park Development, the owner of the clock tower building, purchased it for $31 million in November. The same company owns the adjacent site at 29-37 41st Avenue, where it filed earlier this month to build a 70 story building at that site.

After a public hearing is held by LPC, a report will be produced and the commission will review it. They will then vote whether to landmark or not– or schedule another meeting. If they vote to landmark it, it will go to the City Planning Commission to provide feedback and the city council for a vote.

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Public Hearing by sunnysidepost

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frozen

Knock it down, and have a competition for 8th graders to design a building 40 floors high, using only 3 materials to build it with Steel, Glass and concrete. “what the 8 graders have been doing that for 5 years around LIC” make it residential apartments and charge an exorbitant rent of 5000 a month and say the reason it’s so high is because of the convenience of being so close to the 7 line and it’s reliable service. oh put a cvs on the ground floor and a dunkin donuts. you can’t stop progress.

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