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Hochul Signs Gianaris Bill That Aims to Clamp Down on ‘Iron Pipeline’ and Fight Gun Trafficking

A bill, sponsored by Sen. Michael Gianaris, aims to crack down on guns being transported into New York from other states. It was signed into law by Hochul Wednesday (Photo by Thomas Def via Unsplash)

Dec. 27, 2021 By Michael Dorgan

Governor Kathy Hochul has signed a Queens senator’s bill into law that requires the state to publish a quarterly report about the origins of guns used in crimes — including who purchased them and where.

The bill, sponsored by State Sen. Michael Gianaris, aims to crack down on guns being transported into New York from other states. It was signed into law by Hochul Wednesday.

The legislation requires the Division of Criminal Justice Services and New York State Police to report on where a firearm was bought if it was used in a crime in New York state. Furthermore, the report must include information as to whether the perpetrator had a license or permit to possess the firearm.

Gianaris said the bill will keep tabs on the “iron pipeline” of guns being trafficked into New York from other states. The iron pipeline refers to the process where criminals purchase guns in states with less restrictive gun laws – usually in the south — and smuggle them into states such as New York and New Jersey.

Around two-thirds of the guns used in crimes in New York were brought in from other states, Gianaris said in a statement, citing a 2015 New York Times report.

“Despite having among the toughest gun laws in the country, our state experiences too many gun-related deaths due to firearms originating elsewhere,” Gianaris said. “While the federal government will not take action to combat gun violence, New York should use data to expose states that are part of the problem.”

The signing of the bill was welcomed by activist groups that aim to end gun violence.

Rebecca Fischer, Executive Director of New Yorkers Against Gun Violence, said that guns trafficked into New York from other states plague communities and take lives every day.

“This new law will improve accountability and transparency, revealing the states responsible for the senseless gun violence impacting New Yorkers,” Fischer said.

Meanwhile, Melissa Gallo, a volunteer with the New York chapter of Moms Demand Action, said that having origin information on guns used in crimes is very important.

“[It] can help us gain a fuller understanding of the scope of the gun violence crisis, the impact of interstate gun trafficking, and what actions we must take to ensure the safety of New York communities,” Gallo said.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

10 Comments

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Ed Haertel

“Straw purchase” (i.e. someone buying a firearm for someone else or for further sale) is a Federal felony. That does not mean it doesn’t happen, but there are far fewer firearms in NY state as a result of such evasions of law as there are firearms which were stolen from the original owner and subsequently moved through the criminal community. The “law” of supply and demand makes firearms stolen in any state with fewer restrictions on firearm ownership far more valuable if moved to any state/city which has extensive firearm restrictions. NY state, and particularly NYC, is a prime target as a state/city with stringent firearm statutes.

Other than being used to prop up state demands for National Instant (background) Check System (NICS) data releases to the states*, any “data” resulting from this law will be more useful in determining which states have the greatest number of firearm thefts.

* The law establishing the NICS requires the data of “passing” checks be deleted within 24 hours, so such a move won’t do much good without Congress amending the statute. Even then the only data submitted beyond the buyer’s ID is whether the firearm was a long gun (i.e. rifle or shotgun) or a handgun. No further identifying information about the firearm is submitted. To trace an individual firearm recovered requires starting at the factory sale to a wholesaler through the retailer to the initial buyer. This is a manual paperwork process which ends at the first buyer unless that buyer actually sold the firearm and kept a record of the subsequent buyer.

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Viva Libertas

SCOTUS may rule that this nonsense is taking away people’s Right to defend themselves. Government’s request to lay down your defense is a blatant act of war on the Republic.

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This requires the state to publish a report about the origins of guns used in crimes

You’re upset that criminals may lose the right to “defend” themselves? If you tried reading, say, the first sentence or two you might not be so offended.

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AOCU812

Locking up criminals isn’t part of the plan. Doesn’t fit the marxist narrative of criminals as victims of a capitalist society.

Let me know when politicians do away with their own armed personal security detail.

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The crime created industrial complex

Cults often use behavior modification on followers, such as thought- stopping techniques and instilling an “us-versus-them” mindset, Hassan said. With thought-stopping techniques, members are taught to stop doubts from entering their conversation or even their consciousness about the cult, often with a key phrase they repeat.

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This is about report about the origins of guns used in crimes

That’s in the first sentence. What does that have to do with personal security details? Maybe you’re having a senior moment?

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