You are reading

Grocery Stores Should Require Customers to Wear Masks Inside Store: Mayor

Fresh N Save 46th and Greenpoint Ave. Sunnyside (Photo: QueensPost)

April 15, 2020 By Allie Griffin

New York City grocery stores should require customers to wear a face covering or mask while shopping amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, Mayor Bill de Blasio said today.

“I’m giving the guidance to all supermarkets and groceries — require customers, require customers to wear face coverings when they come in,” de Blasio said at a press briefing this morning.

He said stores should put up a sign at the entrance requiring shoppers to wear a face covering in order to enter the store.

The mayor said every store has the right to make the requirement.

“That is legal and appropriate,” de Blasio said. “The City will back you up.”

Any customer who refuses to wear a mask can be denied entry into the grocery store and if there’s a problem with compliance, store employees can call 311 to have police officers come and assist them, he added.

“It’s the smart thing to do for the health of all New Yorkers and the City of New York will back you up.”

The mayor called grocery store workers the “unsung heroes in this fight.”

“These are folks just trying to make a living for their families,” de Blasio said. “They did not expect to be on the frontlines of an international crisis, but they’re acting with the same resolve and the same spirit as all our other heroes.”

He said New Yorkers owe a lot of appreciation and respect to the workers and their families.

“Let’s give a lot of appreciation, a lot of respect to the people who make sure we get fed,” the mayor said. “Those grocery store workers, those supermarket workers — they get up everyday, they go to work, it’s a tough job.”

The Mayor’s Office is also working with supermarket and grocery store companies to ensure store employees get PPE supplies, he added.

email the author: [email protected]

6 Comments

Click for Comments 
Sara Ross

I go to a key food in queens and there are signs outside that say customers have to wear masks, no exceptions.

Reply
Guest

Natalie, it’s beyond shame, we are practically begging China, Russia and other countries to help us with PPE. Why can’t we still make them in USA I don’t understand. America was supposed to be great again. Almost all other countries have plenty, but I think people just want to make as much money as possible.

3
4
Reply
Arvin

If things are more efficient in Colombia why are people sneaking across the border to get here?.Wouldn’t it make sense for people to emigrate there? Shame on NYC for not offering the many opportunities that exist in Colombia!!

11
5
Reply
Sunnyside Loves Me Long Time

I’ve easily bought them in three different neighborhood bodegas. A sandwich baggie of six masks for an average of $2.50 each. Ask around. They’re usually behind the counter.

5
11
Reply
Natalie

Would be nice if we can actually find a protective face mask instead of wearing cloth. My family in Colombia sent me some through the mail when I told them I could not find any here. Shame on one of the most richest cities in the world and most expensive and taxed places to live.

21
13
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

Jan. 27, 2023 By Bill Parry

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.