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Gianaris Calls on College Board to Administer SATs Digitally

(Photo by Ben Mullins on Unsplash)

Nov. 23, 2020 By Allie Griffin

State Senator Michael Gianaris is calling for the college entrance SAT exam to be held remotely amid rising coronavirus cases nationwide.

Gianaris penned a letter to the CEO of the College Board — which administers the SAT exam to high schoolers — to advise against in-person testing.

He called on the College Board to provide digital testing options for all students instead. He also asked the test administrators to waive the SAT fees that incur from in-person testing.

Gianaris said many parents and students don’t feel comfortable gathering with others in order to take the exam.

“Students and parents throughout New York are anxious about the dangers associated with holding the college entrance exam in large, crowded locations,” he wrote in the Nov. 20 letter. “As we experience a new wave of covid-19 infections, we need a different solution.”

He also pointed to the fact that all public school classes in New York City have gone fully remote due to an increase in the citywide COVID-19 positivity rate.

The Astoria senator said the College Board should follow suit.

“With remote learning now the norm for city students, the College Board needs to revisit the wisdom of requiring in-person testing and associated fees in the current environment,” Gianaris said.

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9 Comments

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guest

Gianaris, he was the one who circulated those upside down amazon frown flyers, right?
What now, how is that area now? No mans land, LIC got half empty people fled and now they are attacking runners or smoking pot and drinking by waterfront. Great job, thank you for driving amazon away.

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Sunnysideposthatesme

The entire education system needs reform . Too many idiots and this virus has proven the school system is corrupt

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The new abnormal

Future headline:

All SAT test takers amazingly get perfect score for first time in history!

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ABoondy

colleges need to have their own tests and they need to stop with the remedial classes. if you cant pass their entrance exam, then you dont get in. simple as that. you cant trust the SAT anymore.

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Zoe

Not all students have computer or internet access. They should send it by mail to every student and drop out like they did with the ballots for voters. I am sure there will be no cheating.

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Mac

And you’re right there was no cheating. Even when Trump Giuliani , crazy Sydney and the rest of the legal dream team went into court they never once put in their court filings, or said to the judges, anything about cheating or fraud. Rudy, Sydney and the dream team save the talk about cheating and fraud for their gullible supporters.

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ABoondy

not everyone will be a success story. some just dont want to apply themselves. life aint fair. too bad so sad. work hard, sacrifice, and struggle, and maybe you might get a chance at a better life. poverty isnt a lifelong hardship if you are presented with opportunity. there are so many city services that you can use to move on up.

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