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Editorial: The 108 Pct. Police Rally Was a Deeply Troubling Event

Diane Ballek speaking at the pro-police rally on Aug. 22 (Michael Dorgan, Queens Post)

Aug. 24, 2020 Editorial: Queens Post

The pro-108 police rally in Sunnyside was a low point Saturday and showed how fractured our city and nation has become.

We were deeply saddened when we left the event—by the loss of humanity that became apparent. People have forgotten that good people can have differences of opinion and view the world differently. It made us feel like the great country we have immigrated to may have taken an ugly turn.

The organizers of the pro-police rally are people we have known for years and are active members of the Sunnyside, Woodside and Long Island community. Many of them volunteer at food pantries, organize toy drives for children in shelters, form boys and girls clubs, clean up graffiti, raises funds for the less fortunate and more.

You may disagree with their rally—and their beliefs–but people have lost sight of the people involved. To us, it was sad to see these good people treated with contempt, disdain and disrespect. They may be misguided, in the eyes of many, but they are not awful racists as some would like to call them.

The Queens Post has covered western Queens for more than a decade and we have gone to more civic meetings, non-profit events and public meetings than we care to remember. Therefore, we know most of these people and what they have contributed.

Take the main rally organizers— Diane Ballek, Richard O’Connor and Mark Wilensky.

Ballek organizes a toy drive every holiday season, where the hundreds of items she collects are then distributed to children at shelters. She works with restaurants to make sure that low-income families receive free meals at a number of events during the year. Her brother—who was a detective in the NYPD– was killed as a result of 9/11. She has been on the community board for years.

Meanwhile, O’Conner has been a volunteer at the St Raphael’s food pantry in Long Island City for more than 20 years. He also works with a number of civic groups to make sure the less fortunate are cared for.

Then there is Wilensky who has been an active community member for decades. He was a co-founder of the Woodside Sunnyside Boys and Girls Club which provided after-school programming for young children while it existed. He has been a long-time member of the Woodside-Sunnyside Lions Club, which raises money for a number of charities. I’ve seen him organize Easter and Halloween Parties for children whose parents are of limited means.

There were many other long-time civic leaders at the rally too—all who have contributed a great deal over the years.

Yet these people were treated with such derision. They were unable to walk along the pathway in the park. People yelled over them. 

Yes, there is an argument as to why the rally should not have taken place. For instance, many protesters make a good case that the march represented an endorsement of a policing system where black and brown people are routinely beaten and killed. They argue–with evidence to back up their claims– that police officers often abuse their power.

But it’s not always so simple– especially if you know the people.

We saw a number of police officers at the rally that we have grown to appreciate over the years. These are officers we know our elected officials respect too.

For instance, the two community affairs officers—Marcos Torres and Luis Diaz– were there. We always see them at precinct meetings and they have worked with this publication organizing running events in the area, which have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for charities. Those events would not have occurred without them.

They are always courteous and professional. They have families—we often inquire. They are good men—and represent the diversity of the force.

We saw some of the neighborhood police officers—Xiomara Ramizez and Kenneth McLoughlin, who we have got to know.

These are just some of the cops we saw at the event Saturday.

These pro-precinct supporters were not out there to say—police brutality is ok. They weren’t there to say that they agree with the blue wall of silence. They weren’t there to say police reform or justice reform is not needed.

No, they were out there to tell Diaz, Torres, Ramizez and McLoughlin that they support them and appreciate them.

They were there to say that they won’t turn their backs on them– even though it’s politically expedient to do so.

We were there on Saturday merely as observers—as publishers.

At the end of the event, Diaz turned to us and said: “Thanks for your support, guys.”

Neither one of us had the heart to tell him that we were there to cover it as media. As a result, we felt afterward like we had let down a friend– empty.

Czarinna Andres and Christian Murray, co-publishers of the Queens Post.

email the author: [email protected]

82 Comments

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John O

The publishers/authors of this editorial identify and provide context for the organizers of Saturday’s rally, but do not name a single person responsible for “[treating] good people . . . with contempt, disdain and disrespect” and for apparently calling thos e good people “awful racists.” Is the omission intentional? Do the publishers fear the backlash of “cancel culture?” Or is it because no one knows them and they have nothing to do with the neighborhood?

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Anonymous

You’re SO biased. You just posted a glowing editorial about the organizers of this pro-police rally. Who called for that? Understand that they’re backing a profession not a human category. The doctors don’t put POLICE on their birth certificate do they? They DO NOT need to be coddled. They need to stop brutalizing citizens.

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Johnny Cakes

Common sense called for it. The pro-police group was painted with the broad strokes of being racist because they want to support the good cops that help this precinct. Alot of the people in the group including the organizers do more for black, brown and other minorities on a daily basis than you will ever accomplish by holding up your sign. Do the real work instead of being trendy and feeling you are helping with a hashtag! If you engaged with a conversation with them you may come to find out that we all agree on a lot of things including the statement Black Lives Matter. The group BLM however has been hijacked by special interests along with funding from special interests and along the way has called for cops to be killed. You have NEVER heard from the other side, let’s kill minorities!

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60%

Wasn’t there an article about how the park around the corner from the 108th pct had to hire private security?
Maybe they should be policing instead of being disorderly?

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Donna

The answer is education, education, education. But this will require wresting power back from the racist Trump administration and his corrupt republican party. If you really want to do something, vote for Biden in November! And vote out all the republican senators and representatives who are blocking change!

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LIC Direct

You want to make change, then vote – vote the no good politician’s out of office, vote. DiBlasio is out of office in less than 2 years, Jimmy Van Bramer is on the way out of office and remember let’s prevent him from ever running again, Daniel Dromm is another one who should be on the way out of office. Vote for people that will represent you and not look out for those Real Estate interests or who support the Homeless Hotels Complex and Not for Profit Syndicate. Go to the community board meetings, confront the likes of — Lisa Deller – Chairwoman of the Community Board and also of the Land Use committee – She’s also works for a Real Estate Investment Fund – she wears more than two hats — monitor how many projects has she pushed through over the years – smells of impropriety. So much is wrong but begin with the Crooked politicians and our so called local representatives. Call then out when you stroll through the neighborhood and run into them.

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Robert

This is just the latest ice bucket challenge. The events of 2020 in NYC are the culmination of a perfect storm. Bail reform pandemic requiring masks mass furlough/unemployment racial police event Central Park Karen demonstrations looters = people looking for something to do/believe in / get out of the house / fireworks / lawlessness. And it’s going to get worse.

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Nancy

I am a middle aged White woman supporting BLM. Get over it! Enough is enough. All people are equal. They had every right to express themselves.

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EuropeanImigrant

Identity politics on steroids – just tiresome. Reading this nonsense will make anyone who didn’t join the march or the protests feel better. Both these marches are the result of a cathartic, albeit fleeting, release from Coronavirus confinement. Now I know why so many people that could are leaving this city. Its all so tiresome from both sides!

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Justice4All

Dear pro-police marchers and neighbors,
Like spike says “do the right thing”••••••Do it because things have to change. It isn’t your experience and you can’t do anything about that. But you and everyone else can change things. First and foremost you have to give up on Trump. Then you have to protest to the new President. Things will change.

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#wheresjimmy?

Dear justice
Please don’t tell us how to vote
You are a tool of the far left which hates the USA

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#pleasegoaway

Thanks for telling adults how to vote ! Great to know that many of the counter protestors were not from this area and came to cause problems for those of us who live here have kids in school here own homes and wanted to stay here
This neighborhood is seeing businesses close and people leave the state and antifa and blm came here to threaten and demoralize us even more
Nice going You seem to have lots of free time but then again you don’t work

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justice4some

it isn’t my experience so i don’t care…if you don’t want police around stop committing crimes…simple logic…otherwise keep committing crimes and blame your situation on white people…that will surely help drive them away and all their tax dollars….that will solve the problem!…see ya in the burbs!!

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Martha

Anyone now can go along with the masses when it can be posted on social media for a dopamine hit from a like. But until white people start demanding en masse that their own taxes be raised to fund black communities that were decimated by white greed: see their protesting and proclamations for what they are: Theater. White protestors are supporting building name changes and marching because it costs them whatever a pen and poster board goes for these days, they feel good doing it, and everyone pats them in the back. In short, the cost is zilch. But until city/county council/school board meetings have lines out the door with white people demanding to be taxed more to pay for overdue structural change, consider the enthusiasm disingenuous. Tax me. Now.

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read a history book

black communities had 2 parent families low unemployment and low crime in the 1940s and 50s…then the progressives in the 1960s turned our country into a welfare state and destroyed the black nuclear family and ghetto-ized black communities…we need to spend less taxes and stop subsidizing poverty…more money back into the economy and more job opportunities…and stop encouraging single parent families with govt incentives…the best social program ever is having a job

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Kayla

I’m sorry but some views on here are an oversimplification based on systematic racism, privilege and ignorance. The BLM movement is organizing. You may not see it if you are not involved but I assure it’s happening. Donations are up and grass roots organizations are seeing surges of new members. My grandchildren in college are organizing around campaigns and are committed to social justice in all forms.

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rainbows and unicorns

a small bunch of spoiled self entitled brats with a faux education they overpaid for who think they are smarter and more experienced in life matters is not a “movement”…more taxes to grow more poverty, more crime, and de-fund the police are not winning campaign slogans…the social justice phonies are gonna be crushed in November….see ya at the polls!!

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Tamara

For many white people protesting is trendy. Consider how many of the white protesters, so concerned about social and economic justice, forced out/priced out much of the Latino and black community in NYC to live in places like Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. Consider that while many wore masks to the protests they removed them when returning to the neighborhood, flooded our streets and parks, and most didn’t social distance. It’s hard not to see the protests as just another party for many of them. Many white people are along for an exciting ride; once they get bored they’ll move onto something else.

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Hasan

How many White and Black suspects would still be alive, if they just allowed themselves to be handcuffed and taken to jail. Then, see the judge in the morning, and go home to the wife and kids. I would say nearly all. Don’t do drugs!

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Hope Floats

Police don’t have the right to execute anybody. It is a complete failure of the state when it happens.

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Sean

Black lives matter, all lives matter. That is the rub. When race does not differentiate, the common interest is not race. The demonstrators want fairness and prosperity for everyone. The original founders of Black Lives Matter never wanted that to be the message because they want compensation to make up for the ways they see African Americans have been either discriminated against or ignored. They are not seeking equity, they want payback and payoffs. They are outraged and need a lot more than equal opportunities. Those white supporters have no idea about this side of Black Lives Matter, they just think that all lives and deserve the same rights as all others.

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Uncle Sam

I appreciate your view. I believe you have a thorough misunderstanding of the Black Lives Matter movement (the largest civil rights movement in American history) and American history for that matter. What is our next step, you and me?

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C'mon cops, just be nice

It seems to me that if a great deal of people have a problem with the police, who are supposed to serve and protect the people, that’s a police problem.

I’m a chef/owner of a local restaurant (you may know me if I say hooray for the bike lanes on Skillman) and if the people don’t like my food, that’s my problem. And I’ll definitely be defunded! #LGM

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Clavicle K. Hugsman

I wasn’t able to make it to this protest by the police, but by reading this editorial I have to assume they were hindered in their free speech by those with absolute power and impunity. The same old tricks:

• A curfew by the governor making the protest nearly impossible to attend
• Deceitful kettling by the “peacekeepers”
• A chaos of swinging batons on the skulls, limbs, and bodies of unarmed and peaceful protestors
• Scene after scene of bulging musclemen pushing much smaller people to the pavement
• Chemical weapons such as tear gas and pepper balls
• Non-lethal ammo that still sometimes becomes lethal or causing serious injuries
• Plowing through crowds of peaceful marchers with government vehicles
• Random and secret abductions into minivans
• Agents placed within the crowd of protestors to cause violence and destruction of property, escalating the event from peaceful to a so-called riot
• Arrests and containment in dangerous conditions prone to the deadly virus

It’s really sad that the NYPD, one of the world’s largest and most expensive armies, supported by the mayor, city council, governor, Congress, and the President, and apparently this newspaper and a great deal of my neighbors, have to feel so unappreciated (the high pay, pensions, benefits, power and placards can’t numb the pain) that they can’t even get up the energy to do their jobs anymore.

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#wokemuch?

Are you on drugs? The pro police people were peaceful: the anarchists, BLM supporters and antifa crowd were and are not. Are you seeing what is happening in Seattle and Portland or are you going to deny that BLM and antifa are violent?

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Antifa

Impressive that you were able to tear yourself away from Fox News long enough to write this racist paragraph. Bravo.

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Tone deaf

Let’s take a step back and imagine what the correct stand would be if things were different. Imagine Sunnyside IS a small town with a majority right-leaning population and representation. A minority of residents inspired by nationwide BLM rallies decides to lead their own march with dozens expected to show up (something actually happening in small towns across the nation). The conservative district leaders write an incendiary op-ed to decry incitement to violence and call for the rally to be canceled. A counter rally forms that brings police and race-fueled confrontation to the peaceful march.

In my estimation, this editorial in that situation would STILL be defending the character of the counter protesters. However, the reality is that Sunnyside is a majority minority community in one of the most progressive areas of the city. This rally was hosted by a minority of residents and was immediately decried as inappropriate and ill-conceived given the ongoing national conversation about civil rights as they relate to the need for systemic police reform.

Motivations and community standing of the organizers are irrelevant, because ANY pro-police rally would have been met with the same reaction. It’s easy to personalize things, but doing so at the expense of recognizing the context perpetuates the flawed reasoning of the organizers. The rally should have been canceled or postponed, or perhaps rebranded to include Black Lives Matter speakers instead of featuring an unmasked racist shouting about “the Silent Majority” and otherising minorities in the most racially diverse county in the country and most linguistically diverse community in the world. The rally should not be defended the way you’re attempting to do here.

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Jim Magee

This comment, however well intentioned, is factually incorrect. The people of this neighborhood DID march down Queens Blvd in protest of George Floyd’s murder.

And, as an aside, historically, Skillman Avenue gave quarter to homosexuals who were being mistreated by the Catholic Church on St. Patrick’s Day for decades DESPITE the reality that most of the people who lived here then were Catholic social conservatives.

This neighborhood is a wonderful place. Where people are able to admit an error.

I don’t see a lot of that elsewhere in the Country. And I think, I hope, that that was the point of the editorial.

But I always look forward to education. So correct me if anything that I’ve just written is wrong. Your suggestion of the inclusion of BLM on 8/22 is well taken.

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Gardens Watcher

The Ancient Order of Hibernians ran the traditional St. Patrick’s Day parade in Manhattan (not the Catholic Church), and for years they banned gays and lesbians (Irish and Irish-Americans) from marching under a separate banner.

The inclusive St. Pats For All parade was first held in 2000, and was the last parade held this year before Cuomo’s Executive Order (NYPause). Seems like an eternity ago.

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Tone deaf

Thanks for the thoughtful comment, Jim. The thought exercise I posted was simply to illustrate my opinion that this editorial would better reflect local sentiment in a far different, nastier, “small town” version of Sunnyside. I am fully aware of the fact that there are other local supporters of BLM (who were depicted as “enraged protesters” in this publication on June 4, 2020).

As an aside, I am very glad you mention the LGBTQ community and invite you to another thought. I have marched in the St. Pat’s For All parade, and each time notice the small group of protesters. Imagine a small group of anti-LGBTQ Sunnysiders, with sparkling credentials of course, put on a march supporting the traditional exclusion of LGBTQ groups with hundreds expected to show up. I also think there would be an outcry and protests that would malign and even dehumanize the organizers. In my estimation, the Queens Post opinion piece in that situation would STILL be defending the character of the organizers instead of recognizing the moral deficiency of the endeavor.

Do you see where I’m going here? The deeply troubling thing about this event was that it was held and that it is being defended in this flawed manner.

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Jim Magee

Thank you for responding Tone.

I think we have a disagreement. Correct me if I am wrong, but it’s your belief that this was a bad time to have a march in support of the NYPD.

I don’t think so. I think we all rely on the NYPD in ways that we don’t always realize. Now I went to the rally. It was mostly older people, parents of people I grew up with. I couldn’t stay until the end. But when I was there it wasn’t an angry mob. I would have left immediately had it been. Maybe the character of it changed after I peeled off (44th Street), in which case I apologize. But my wife and I ran into two women that I’ve known for decades, later in the afternoon who had been at the march, and one of them was in tears. Her son had been PD and died suddenly. Not someone who was looking to shove a finger in anybody’s face.

Now I’ve marched in St. Pat’s For All many times and was at the March following Floyd’s murder. And, although I’ve noticed who you are referring to at St. Pat’s (gives me chills even thinking about it) through the years, they have become more and more marginalized then they already were when I first went 20 years ago. And that’s a wonderful thing. And I was again impressed at the civility of the Floyd March as we were cordoned by PD.

I will tell you where we do not have a disagreement, the groups looking to protest the march should have been invited to the march. That would have been excellent. And it was irresponsible and tone deaf not to have done so. That was a missed opportunity. You’re right.

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Tone deaf

Jim, you are correct. We disagree for the reasons you mention. I believe this march was as tone deaf as an anti-mask march in the middle of a respiratory pandemic. Mother Theresa could have organized it, it doesn’t matter. She, like anyone else, is not immune to controversy or criticism.

For what it’s worth, I don’t think everyone who marched was a racist. But I do think that the symbolism was a coup for the few marginalized racists who got sweet validation in hearing the council member shout code words and blow dogwhistles as if they were music to their ears. This doesn’t further marginalize them. It empowers them.

The anti-St. Pat’s for All people have become marginalized because no one held a parade that was red meat for them. Actually, maybe someone did, because the anti-JVB crowd have expressed virulent homophobia as of late…but that’s for another conversation!

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really??

“The rally should have been canceled or postponed, or perhaps re-branded to include Black Lives Matter speakers…” so if people want to publicly express their views and exercise their right to free speech they must do it on your terms? more communist mental defectives trying to throw away our constitution.

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Anon

It’s important to question the use of divisive language like “pro-police rally” vs. “protestors” (rather than “protestors” and “counter-protestors”). This clearly attempts to mark one side as right and good and the other as disruptive and bad.

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Destiny

I refuse to be apart of a group that only thinks my life matters if I’m killed by a white police officer.

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Lorraine Diehl

We work the Knights of Columbus Halloween and Easter it was an honor to March w 108..bc i was born and raised in Woodside, Lorraine Sheehy and Arline Syperick

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Jason

Nice letter. When is there another stimulus check? Me and my familia are sufferin. Donde está el dinero?

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"I issued an executive order to shutdown Twitter because of one tweet"

“but I love freedom of speech!” — Trump

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Fiona

When we go there will be none. Sunnyside will go on with new people. But there will be no one left to remember what is was like for us.

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Joan DeLisio

As to your last statement in the article; it seems you DO support the good officers, so feel no guilt or sadness/ embrace the officer’s words of gratitude, you do deserve it, no matter you were there as reporters.

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Mark Wilensky

Thank you so much for this article. I can’t put in words how this made me feel. It really made me feel like a really special person.

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Jim Magee

I was unaware that the Sunndyside Post even did editorials. As far as editorials are concerned I believe this one to be magnificent. Maybe that is a testament to the authors, but I believe it to be a testament to this particular place and time. Where the LIE passes the BQE next to the 59th Street Bridge just outside of New York Harbor when the United States itself is having a gut check.

There is no human civilization without a police force. People need the time to go and get food for their families. While most people are doing the simple work of sustenance, there has to be an organization that can watch their back while they do so. That’s what a civilization is: trusting people to do their job.

There are dangers involved when you give people the authority to kill and to arrest. Im of the opinion that the NYPD is the best of those, but still is not as good as it can be.

I don’t think that the way to make it better is to defund it.

I’m not trying to be coy. If you cut the salaries of the NYPD you are going to get a worse class of people armed with guns and badges.

This Country, this City, and, in my limited opinion (Ive rarely lived anywhere else), this neighborhood, have been the crucible of what human beings can do when they 1) go to work and 2) trust one another.

Let’s not give up on each other.

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Gardens Watcher

Excellent editorial! I trust that our community “leaders” will read this, as well as the march coverage posted by Michael Dorgan. Perhaps they could respond in a thoughtful way. By the way, where were our community leaders on Saturday?

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Luke Adams's Enlightened Ghost

The community “leaders” who weren’t there are COWARDS. Do not vote for them again simply because there is a “d” next to their name.

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ABoondy

they dont care for respect. all they want is to destroy everything we worked so hard to build. the only ones that are anti-cop are criminals. plain and simple.

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Johnny Cakes

What about the non-whites who immigrated/moved to Sunnyside and worked hard to make this a great place to live? They earned it as well

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Anonymous

Right now any pro police rally is a kick in the face to the BLM protestors. As u said in the editorial our black and brown residents don’t feel supported. To them this is tantamount to a white power (blue lives) Demi

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Black olives matter

Spare us your paranoid hyperbole. If you want to view a pro NYPD gathering as some sort of KKK rally, that’s your problem.

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frank

Just don’t understand why we can’t support both BLM and the NYPD? I do and have participated in events for both as i have plenty of friends who are officers. I’m not a fan of the PBA supporting trump who tramples the law but that’s the stand of the union and not the position of individuals. Show respect as the rank and file officers are putting their lives on the line to protect us. In fact just show respect period.

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You miss the point

A list of bona fides of the organizers does not magically absolve them of the harm they’ve done in hosting this march. Good people can do bad things and very quickly be treated accordingly like bad people.

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ThisArticleWasLame

but one of them gave toys to kids? doesn’t that erase all the horrible things the NYPD has done? I guess they can just keep abusing people as long as they run a toy collection

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Steve Roberts

This March harmed no one how soon we forget how NYPD rushed into the towers to rescue people no matter there race or ethnic background . There are many instances of police helping others regardless of there backgrounds or race or religion.

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Shane

I think you misunderstand. The pro-police supporter no more need your permission to march and represent for their view than vice versus. They’re not sheep and are presenting a counterview to the current BLM narrative dominant in mainstream media.

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Sunglasses

There was no misunderstanding. BLM and the fascist antifa don’t care about any past heroics by NYPD or NYFD or about Liberty or God or Mom or Apple Pie. Their intent is to organize themselves, and other gullible, malleable “useful idiots” to create chaos in the larger society. Why? To disrupt, and ultimately destroy the United States of America as founded in order to bring forth, Phoenix-like, a socialist utopia out of the ashes of what was once our country–the nation Lincoln called “the last, best hope of Earth;” and, then blend it into a repressive global New World Order. Ironically, if these earnest young BLM/antifa fascists should actually achieve their goal, they would be among the first to be purged by the dictatorial Ruling Few in order to prevent any challenge to the new Powers-That-Be. While there were a handful of local Republicans at the co-opted pro-Police rally, the vast majority of the NYPD supporters were Democrats. My distinct impression is that they were frightened and appalled at what even they must see now is the future of their Party. DAs has been pointed out, it may be difficult to know what is true because the media have lied to us for so long; but, I beg Democrats who are alarmed by the rising tide of Fascism to reconsider your vote this November 3rd. The 911 Commission concluded that the international terrorists ” of 2001 were at war with us; but, we weren’t at war with them.” Well, these BLM/antifa activists, childish as they are, are the vanguard of a violent civil disruption that we haven’t been as close to since 1865. Want to prevent it? Stop voting for the entrenched local establishment pols, do NOT vote for their socialist challengers either, and consider voting to re-elect the current President, who, if you only know from the main stream media, you don’t know at all. Wake up.

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Sunglasses

“A counterview to BLM is black lives don’t matter. Just come out and say it Karen.”
Ah, such broad strokes asserted so confidently. Here we see the fascists’ tendency to wrap their Marxist scam in the idea–and even the actual word–of justice. Tellingly, they call it “social justice.” Your tactics have been exposed, Vladimir…er…”Anonymous.”

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Black olives matter

They’ve done no harm to anybody by marching. Spare us the drama queen rhetoric.

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Color me annoyed

It was a “low point” thanks to gutless people like Jimmy Van Bramer and Mike Gianaris among others who have thrown the 108th and other precincts under the bus – as well as those of us who have relatives in law enforcement. We do not appreciate being called “racists” by people who do not know us and do not know what is in our hearts. I am disgusted by the BLM group and their supporters who were waiving fists at us, disrupted us and yes, threatened us. The lack of respect for the 108th Precinct Council as well as tax paying citizens was appalling.

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ysd

lmao ‘waving fists at us’ you mean the symbol of the black power fist thats been around for thats 4 decades? that scared you?

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Gardens Watcher

Grace’s cap says MORE SELF-LOVE. Maybe you should practice that, ysd. With the other hand of course.

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SuckItUpMargaret

Doesn’t matter if you don’t appreciate it, it’s the truth. People don’t “appreciate” your racism. Well, maybe these people do.

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#wokemuch?

I was disgusted by the BLm/Antifa supporters who were downright threatening and, let me add, that the pro police/108th Precinct attendees included many Hispanics from our community. The other group had participants who were menacing, mean and disrespectful. Local store owners – many of them Hispanic women – have told me that they are afraid of the BLM group.

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ThisArticleWasLame

awww they were mean to the people supporting a power abusing and racist police force. how sad.

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Retired and laughing at you

You are silly. There are as many rascist teachers and nurses as there are rascist cops. Most cops aren’t rascist, most in NYC aren’t even white. If you think the justice system is rascist, then protest the politicians and lawmakers. They are the ones that make the laws that cops enforce and you are just as complicit, if not more so because you vote for them
Cops jobs are law and order. Get better laws.

As for comments that cops murder people, very few do(technically it would be manslaughter but ignorant BLM posters have no brain). Doctor’s kill thousands per year by negligence, why not protest them?
The system won’t change, so go home already. As long as you are sick enough to protest a whole group, for what maybe a few did, you are prejudiced. That’s no better than being a rascist. But your stupid enough to think it is.

Also you forget that the people of color were to ones that were saved the most from the presence of cops in the inner city. I have an idea, instead of defunding, let’s pull them out of where they aren’t wanted. We will need more in our area to keep out the riffraff.
As for reparations? Bro, POC should kiss every day they wake up in USA. People come here with nothing just to get a passport and opportunity. If ancestry stayed in Africa, they most likely wouldn’t be born since over there likelihood of dieing from diseases, civil war, crime, malnutrition, or wildlife is greater. Reparations? Instead some of you should pay more taxes since you have been the recepient of more police to protect your neighborhoods. More teachers. More welfare. It isn’t the pro police crowd that get these benefits.
In conclusion: don’t defund. Just vote them out of your neighborhood, and fend for yourself. I will gladly pay taxes to have them in my area.

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Waiting for your apartment to be free

Can you turn your TV down? I can hear Tucker Carlson booming through my walls. Maybe a new hearing aid would do you good. A critical-thinking aid may also help.

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ysd

cops are menacing, mean and disrespectful. if you support them get used to being treated the way they treat everyone else who isnt licking their boots.

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#wokemuch?

And you say these awful things about the police because YOU KNOW EVERY POLICE OFFICER, RIGHT? You are very brainwashed.

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#BLM

Who threatened you? I was there and didn’t see any of that going on. Were you just scared of people standing up to authority that has brutalized and murdered them?

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imright

They know what they’re doing is outdated, cruel, and wrong, so even a glance in their direction scares them.

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