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DOT to Install Temporary Bike Lane Along Crescent Street for Duration of Pandemic

Crescent Street and Hoyt Avenue (Google Maps)

May 13, 2020 By Allie Griffin

The Department of Transportation will install a temporary protected bike lane along Crescent Street, as part of the City’s Open Streets initiative spurred by the coronavirus pandemic.

The nearly mile-long bike lane will run from Queens Plaza North in Long Island City to Hoyt Avenue North in Astoria and will be installed sometime in the coming weeks.

The DOT will place barrels, signage and other barriers along the route for the duration of the pandemic.

The route is one of six temporary bike lanes — totaling nine miles citywide — that will be phased in over the next two weeks as City Hall expands open spaces for pedestrians and cyclists to practice social distancing outdoors.

“Now that warmer weather has arrived, New Yorkers will need more options to enjoy the outdoors at a safe, social distance,” Mayor de Blasio said in a statement.

The six new temporary bike routes will connect cyclists to already-established protected lanes, like those along Queens Plaza and Hoyt Avenue.

The Crescent Street route will connect cyclists from the Triborough Bridge to the Queensboro Bridge.

Many local elected officials praised the announcement today.

“I am thrilled with the Mayor’s announcement of a protected bike lane on Crescent Street, which I believe will save lives and go a long way towards making our environment more sustainable by creating more transportation options,” Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer said.

Meanwhile, State Senator Michael Gianaris also applauded the announcement, but said more improvements are needed. 

“I am glad we are finally seeing better bike infrastructure in western Queens with a protected bike lane on Crescent Street,” Gianaris said. “There is more work to be done, including improving bike access over our bridges.”

Council Member Costa Constantinides, who represents Astoria, said the route was needed well before the coronavirus pandemic.

“Though Crescent Street deserved this protected bike lane long before this pandemic shut down New York City, I am thrilled to see its construction finally begin,” Constantinides said in a statement.

“Going to work shouldn’t be a daily life-or-death scenario, but sadly it too often is,” he added. “Those who can cycle deserve a safe north-to-south route, from the Triboro Bridge to the Queensboro Bridge.”

The temporary lanes announced today may be phased into permanent lanes as city resources come back online and as the DOT gathers additional feedback from affected community boards and elected officials.

“We believe new bike lanes will lay the groundwork for a cycling surge in the months and years to come,” de Blasio said.

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Cuomo for dog catcher 2020

If Cuomo has his way, the pandemic will last forever and so will the bike lanes. He’s loving the spotlight like any narcissist.

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