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Despite Howl From Some Neighbors, Dog & Duck Gets Approval to Add Sidewalk Seats

The-Dog-and-Duck-002June 7, 2015 By Christian Murray

The Dog & the Duck, a gastropub located at 45-20 Skillman Avenue, got the approval it needed from the Community Board Thursday to add 12 outdoor seats.

The approval was controversial and was not rubber stamped like most applications for side-walk seating.

The bar had faced strong opposition when its application to increase the number of outdoor seats from 16 to 28 was initially reviewed by the community board’s Land Use Committee.

“I can’t even image that people in the neighborhood would approve this,” said Lisa Deller, the head of the committee, citing the noise and traffic that the extra seats might generate.

However, Deller decided the committee should not weigh in on the application and that the full board should come to its own conclusion.

The Dog & Duck’s application received the backing of Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer. He spoke in support of the proposal at Thursday’s meeting—about two hours before the full board voted on the application.

“[The Dog & Duck] has made 46th Street a better place to work and raise a family,” Van Bramer told the board. “I want to support this application since small businesses are the life blood of the neighborhood,” he said. He added that the Dog & Duck has also been part of the renaissance of Skillman Avenue.

James Dolan and Padraigh Connolly, the owners of the bar/restaurant, came to the meeting armed with a petition in support of the application. Dolan said that they had generated 500 online signatures in support of the application and more than 100 handwritten signatures.

Dolan told the board that the additional seats satisfy all city regulations. Furthermore, he said, that the bar is a good neighbor–supporting local charities and non profit groups throughout the year.

However, there were residents who live near the establishment who came out against the application.

Jane Schreiber, who lives across the street from the bar/restaurant, alleged that the bar keeps its sidewalk seating area open late at night–beyond the hours it is supposed to. Furthermore, she claimed that when the bar has live music playing inside, it often leaves its windows open and the noise can be heard down the street.

Meanwhile, there were several residents who supported the establishment. “If the Dog & Duck fails, corporations could come in and we will never have a face to talk to again,” said January LaVoy, a resident.

Stephen Cooper, the first-vice president of the board, said Thursday that noise is a fact of life when living next to a restaurant with outdoor seating.

“I have never spoken to a direct neighbor [of a restaurant] who has said they don’t hear noise—it happens. The question is, are they [the neighbors] being unreasonable or are they being reasonable.”

“While we have to be concerned about residents,” Cooper said, “we also have to be concerned about businesses too.”

After further discussion, the board took a vote and the application was approved. There were 30-plus members in support of the application, with four opposed.

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40 Comments

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Dana

If you folks think the Dog and Duck is loud now, just wait until the law is adopted allowing dogs in outdoor restaurant seating areas and the space is enlarged. It’ will make the Lodati Dog Park seem like the Sea of Tranquility.

JOReilly

When Mr. O’Brien became chair of CB 2, he committed to a more transparent board. If I wanted to find out which board members voted to approve the Dog and Duck application and which members opposed, how would I do that? Not from reading the minutes of the board, which albeit are far more detailed and informative than previously, still do not record vote by individual members. If I wanted to read the actual document under consideration by the board, am I still required to make an appointment during the work day to go to the CB 2 office to look at physical paper under guard by a staff member or can I click to read the material on the Board’s website? Until these basic elements of board transparency are resolved, Mr. O’Brien’s commitment is relegated to the “We’re Going To Fix The E-Bike Problem” wing of Empty Government Promises.

truth hurts

I actually thought the food was decent the couple of times I’ve been there. Got a pasta carbonara dish once and a steak sandwich another time. If I had the money for what the rents probably are around here for a business that has activities to keep kids occupied I would definitely open one. I’m sure I’m not the only parent who’d appreciate a kid friendly place like a bounce house or party place that helps tire them out when the weather isn’t cooperating.

John

Whatever you think about the seating, you have to admit the food is just not good. Never has been.

skills man

Great news. Go JVB. It’s a friendly local business that supports the neighborhood. It’s no louder or busier than any other main street in Sunnyside. And a family business…..the owners did a take a risk by investing here….good for them… they deserve the approval.

Bridget Riley

Why don’t you think about the people who live right behind them, next to them, across the street from them? Why do you prefer businesses to residents who have been living here through thick and thin, paying their mortgage or their rent, buying local, being good neighbors? Why do you call them cranks when they want quiet, privacy and cleanlines instead of tipsy people coming and going all the time? Many, many people would be unhappy to have the tenor of their little corner of the world changed in that way because someone decided to take a risk on a business. Theirs isn’t a business, it is a home, which is what we mostly work for. What is the matter with all of you?

SouthSideJohnny

What, four comments in a row by the same person, each of them nasty and crass, somehow validates your own nasty and crass comments? You two should go get a room and have lunch together. You were made for each other.

Sir William Regal

My thoughts are that the Food at the Dog & Duck is terrible the hosts and the Servers are pretentious and the Music is LOUSY.

Sir William Regal

Are u kidding me this neighborhood is crawling with Kid Friendly places what we need is more places where adults can have fun.

silent majority

Please explain. What do you mean? Are you implying a payoff? I personnel know the Dolans and the are wonderful people. A public meeting was held and both sides where heard. You just sound like a bitter person.

truth hurts

It would just be nice to have some variety. This neighborhood is a very bar friendly neighborhood. Great unless you have children who need to be occupied and deserve a little variety just as the adults do. I have been there with my hubby and kids and it was a squeeze. Not everyone wants oe needs alcohol at 11PM.

OldenDays

well maybe we can give you some tips. what are you looking for? i’m not sure i understand what kind of business you have in mind that would keep a child occupied. there’s a lot of restaurants that are less bar-centric, and some that don’t serve alcohol at all. there’s several day-care centers and playgrounds and such. of course we used to have a movie theater but it was under-utilized (and crummy…maybe the two are related!!).

Jimmy Van Payoff

Van Bramer goes to protect a restaurant that wants more outside seats but the business that really needs help he can give two shits. He’s the biggest fake phony in all city politics. He must get fed for free on Saturday when him and his husband go there for shite brunch.
As far as this Irish hole being called a gastro pub that’s like calling Pizza Hut an Italian Trattoria.
And for this pain Lisa Deller Move out if you don’t like it!!!!!
Go find some friends.

truth hurts

It would be great if this neighborhood attracted businesses that we a bit more family friendly. Not much for my kids in this neighborhood, and I don’t plan on bar hopping with 2 kids under 2. Please bring on some quality useful businesses.

Native NYer

I walked past three times today during prime brunch hours and the place was packed with families with young children. It’s not bar hopping to take kids out to brunch, geez. I’ve got to the Dog & Duck numerous times with many configurations, with the hubby, with the hubby and kid, with the kid, with adult friends and with adults friends and kids and we’ve never felt out of place with our without the kids. Granted, we are never in there past 8pm with the kids.

mememe

Are you saying that you bring your kids out at 11pm?

I have a baby and think this neighborhood, including dog and duck, are incredibly family friendly. I’ve walked by a bunch of times during all hours of the day and I don’t think they are particularly loud either.

I just don’t like their food, so I dont go 🙂

Anonymous Visitor

If you feel there is a need not being met why don’t you do something about it and open a kid friendly business?

Lurtz

To all the idiots saying ‘this is good for small business’. Unless you live across the street from this place you really shouldn’t be talking about how loud it gets.

I walk past there at times and you can literally smell the alcohol in the air through out the block.

They should try to be more considerate of their neighbors rather than keeping their seating open later than they should and then having the boards excuse be.. Well I guess you shouldn’t be living next to a bar. Maybe then people would be more supporting.

Also to the genius comparing the noise coming from a bar/restaurant to a PASSING car. The noise from the car at most lasts a minute meanwhile the restaurant lasts all night.

Anonymous Visitor

What do you expect when you leave near the mail avenues??????????????
Move to an apartment in the middle of the blook and this noise won’t bother you. Thanks like moving to Queens Blvd and then complaining about the noise the train makes!!!

Celia

Hey there, I DO live in the middle of the block, and I can hear the noise from the Dog and Duck. Many of us moved to 46th Street before there even was a Dog and Duck. So, no. “What do you expect” is not an appropriate retort. We have a right to quiet enjoyment of the apartments we pay rent for. And if you happened to walk by one day and the noise didn’t bother you, you have hardly made a scientific study of the issue. I strongly suspect that a lot of these anonymous comments are actually coming from The Dog and Duck itself.

Scolar

I walk by there a lot, but I do not “smell alcohol.” They aren’t very noisy, either. I think you have some other issue and these are just excuses.

South Side Johnny

I think they’re selective about who gets the good food and to whom they serve the shyte. I always get the fish and chips and I’ve never had a bad meal there. They’re probably responding to my friendliness and to the fact that I never complain unless there’s a valid reason. I think they see Craic coming from a mile away!

South Side Johnny

That’s a great comeback. Lighten up on the negative remarks and you won’t always be the target of jokes, funny guy.

Craic Dealer

I simply speak the truth. Dog and Duck’s Yelp rating is not that great either. There are pleanty of fine establishments around Sunnyside.

SouthSideJohnny

No, you were being nasty and offensive by saying their food is “shyte.” It’s okay to have an opinion, but your way of expressing it was like hitting someone below the belt.

I’ve had food there a few times and it was fine, considering it’s a pub. You are always so negative about this community that I felt like expressing an opinion of mine, too.

Craic Dealer

:yawn: Congratulations, South Side Johnny on expressing yourself. I always appreciate the 1st Amendment.

Kramden's Delicious Marshall

Seriously, there’s more noise from cars going by with stereos blasting.

Pro small business, not small-mindedness

Great news for those who want more small businesses to invest in our community!

Sunnysider

So these people drink out on the street? Also what do you mean “howl”? Are the neighbors dogs that howl? Sounds disrespectful.

me

of course Van Bramer likes it – its not in front of his residence!

Comments are closed.

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