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Cuomo Signs Gianaris Bill Establishing Automatic Voter Registration in New York

Voters cast their ballot at a polling site in South Ozone Park on Election Day. (Michael Appleton/ Mayoral Photography Office)

Dec. 22, 2020 By Allie Griffin

Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill into law today that establishes an automatic voter registration system in New York.

The new law — sponsored by state Sen. Michael Gianaris — requires specific state agencies, like the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), to established an automatic voter registration system.

The law aims to expedite and streamline voter registration and, in turn, increase voter turnout.

For example, a New Yorker applying for a license through the DMV would be automatically registered to vote.

New Yorkers will have the option to opt out of voter registration, but voter registration will be initiated automatically when they apply for a license or another service.

For voters already registered, they can update any address changes for their vote in the same manner.

The law will take effect on Jan. 1, 2023. New York will join 18 other states which have similar automatic voter registration laws.

“Access to the ballot box should be easy and fair, and enacting Automatic Voter Registration will go a long way towards improving voter participation,” Gianaris said in a statement. “I am proud and thankful that the Governor has signed this bill, paving the way for over a million more New Yorkers to vote.”

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26 Comments

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Say what!

June 2019 Cuomo sign a bill allowing undocumented people to obtain a drivers license. So now noncitizens will automatically be registered to vote in a country that they are not a citizen. Only in america I dont know anywhere in the world that allows this. They just legalized vote fraud.

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Stop the misinformation

Say What- You’re a propagandist. S simple google search proves that. “ In 2017, New York began issuing “REAL ID”-compliant driver’s licenses. The state now employs a multi-tier system, as permitted by federal law, and offers three licenses: (1) the “enhanced” license, (2) The “REAL ID” license, and (3) the “standard” license, which is used for identification purposes and for driving, but is not REAL ID-compliant.Displayed on its face are the words, “NOT FOR FEDERAL PURPOSES”.”

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Say what!

Stop the misinformation: the ” real ID” was implemented from the federal government. The feds started this because of how states started to change there qualifications for obtaining a drivers license. This also was set into place in the Patriot act. Soon we will need a passport to fly within the country or have the correct ” real, enhanced ID “classification. The enhanced ID will also allow holders to travel across the border with Mexico and Canada. As you said ny followed the feds mandate in 2017 and as we all know states manage there own voting process. People applying for a drivers license will now automatically be registered to vote with in ny state. Will the state distinguish between those who are legally allowed to vote and those that are not? Well we will see or we wont. You should understand the difference between federal changes to IDs and the states right to manage their own voting process.

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“ dont know anywhere in the world that allows this.” Except the countries listed below

@say what, That cnn link you provided is in regards to municipal elections. I don’t agree with it but do know it’s a fairly common practice throughout the world. https://ronhayduk.com/immigrant-voting/around-the-world/
GLOBAL RESIDENT VOTING TABLE and TIMELINE

Voting Rights World Table

The following is a partial list of nations in which varying jurisdictions have passed laws permitting noncitizens to cast ballots in the years indicated.

France (2006): 2/3 of residents of town of Saint-Denis votes in favor of allowing noncitizens local voting rights; court rules that vote is non-binding

Bulgaria (2005): EU nationals granted right to vote in local elections

Estonia (2004): Russian-speaking minority with permanent resident status granted voting rights in local elections

Italy (2004): immigrants allowed to vote for four nonvoting members of Rome city council and one nonvoting seat at each of 19 district councils

Belgium (2004): local elections

Luxembourg (2003): local voting rights passed. no nationality restrictions

Austria (2002): local elections in Vienna

Slovakia (2002): local voting rights for 3-year residents

Slovenia (2002): local voting rights for 3-year residents

Lithuania (2002): EU nationals granted local voting rights

Czech Republic (2001): voting rights in local elections approved for EU nationals

Bolivia (1994): changed constitution to allow noncitizens to vote in local elections (not yet implemented)

Colombia (1991):changed constitution to allow noncitizens to vote in local elections (not yet implemented)

Barbados (1990): citizens of British Commonwealth can vote in national elections

Hungary (1990): local elections for permanent residents (revised 2004 to limit to EU nationals)

Germany (1989): states of Schleswig-Holstein approved local voting rights for Danish, Irish, Norse, Dutch, Swedish, and Swiss 5-year residents; state of Hamburg approved local voting for 8-year residents; West Berlin passed local voting for 5-year residents. All were struck down by constitutional court in 1990.

Chile (1989): local and national elections

Iceland (1986): 3-year residents from Nordic Union citizens can vote in local elections

Spain (1985): local elections

Australia (1984): repealed 1947 legislation but grandfathered those registered before 1984

Venezuela (1983): 10-year residents can vote in local and state elections

Finland (1981): Nordic Union citizens can vote in local elections (expanded in 1991 to all 4-year residents)

Netherlands (1979): Local elections in Rotterdam (expanded nationwide in 1985)

Norway (1978): local elections for Nordic Union (expanded in 1995 for 3-year residents)

Denmark (1977): local elections for Nordic Union (expanded in 1981 for all foreign residents)

Portugal (1976): national and some local elections (expanded 1997 to all 3-year residents)

Sweden (1975): local and regional elections, plus some national referenda

New Zealand (1975): local and national elections

Ireland (1963): local elections (expanded 1984 to remove 6-month residency requirement and to allow British citizens the vote on the national level)

Uruguay (1952): national elections for 15-year residents

Israel (1950): local elections for Jewish residents only

Australia (1947): national and local for British nationals only

United Kingdom (1948): national elections for Commonwealth and Irish citizens

Switzerland (1849): 5-year residents in Neuchatel canton (expanded in 1979 for 10-year residents in Jura canton)

Canada (date n/a): Commonwealth citizens only

Brazil (date n/a): Portuguese citizens only

Cape Verde (date n/a): Portuguese citizens only

Belize (date n/a): national and local voting rights for three-year residents

Additional jurisdictions:

European Union (1992): reciprocal local and European Parliament elections for all member nations

Nordic Union (1970s): local elections

Hong Kong: permanent residents are granted local voting rights

Failed or stalled initiatives:

Japan (2000): legislation considered to supercede 1995 supreme court ruling against noncitizen voting rights, but did not pass

Latvia (2000)

France (1981 and 2000)

Source: The Immigrant Voting Project

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Say what!

Lol! The link that you provide lol! Did you notice picture of the old man in the top right that is Carl Marx the father of socialism and communism. I could continue with a ton more points but enough said. Lol! Carl Marx

No you have heard

Say what – Your Link to CNN is about municipal elections. You never heard of a country allowing non citizens the right to vote? Just google countries that non citizens the right to vote. https://ronhayduk.com/immigrant-voting/around-the-world/ Sweden, Norway , Australia, Netherlands, Denmark, Chile and dozens others allow non citizens the right to vote in Municipal elections.

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Say what!

No you have heard: I’m aware that it is for municipal elections. My point is that these politicians intentions are made clear with their actions locally. They start small locally and move towards the goal of federal elections. Your link from this Ronald Hayduk a socialist professor/writer is a joke. If you click on the link you will see a picture in the top left corner of Karl Marx the father of socialism and communism he wrote the communist manifesto.
He literally wrote the book on being a commie. Your source of info is very telling and very sad. There are so many nice people in sunnuside that have fled their countries because of those political policies. You should try meeting some of them and really listen to them.

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David

@Saywhat- If the information provided is true, then just say thank you for the taking the time to inform me on a subject I didn’t know anything about and move on with grace and gratitude.

Who needs a drivers license in NYC?

NYC has the lowest rate of licensed drivers in the country.I got my license at 19 only because my father thought it was a good idea.

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Mac

Cab drivers, bus operators, police officers, FDNY employees, UPS drivers, Federal Express and Amazon drivers.Do I really need to go on?

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Trump lost get over it 400K dead

Voter fraud is Republican gerrymandering. That’s how Republicans win seats. Fact!

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Anonymous

Look at Nadler’s and AOC’s districts and then tell me about Republican Gerrymandering. This includes the 10th district’s 3 block by 1 block bridge to Borough Park.

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Stop the politicizing lies

Anonymous- 5. Republicans drew Congressional boundaries in six of the 10 most-gerrymandered states.
In addition to North Carolina, Republicans drew district boundaries in Louisiana, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Alabama. Democrats drew districts in West Virginia and Illinois, in addition to Maryland. Boundaries in Kentucky were drawn up by that state’s mixed legislature.

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Trump Flu vaccine was not developed by Trump

Good point- 270,000 dead Americans because of a game show host

But a private company made a vaccine. He’s a hero!

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400K dead and counting

It should be the Trump vaccine since Trump killed the most people with the virus.

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Liberals don’t do logic

The tds runs deep in you
You need more therapy
Don’t lose hope !

Fred said Donald was a failure

Trump is trying to take credit for vaccines developed in Britain and Germany. He’ll take credit for anything. What a complete failure his father Fred was right.

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