You are reading

Cooldown Juice in Sunnyside Set to Shutter, Casualty of Rising Business Costs

(Photo Google Maps)

Cooldown Juice, located at 48-19 Skillman Ave., will shutter for good on July 31 (Photo: Google Maps)

July 13, 2022 By Michael Dorgan

On the same day that the Labor Department announced that inflation had surged to a record 40-year high, the owners of a popular juice shop in Sunnyside announced that they will soon close due to rising business costs.

Cooldown Juice, located at 48-19 Skillman Ave., will shutter for good on July 31 after more than seven years in operation. The company is known for its juices, smoothies and cleanses– as well as its healthy snacks and desserts.

Eric Barthels, the co-owner and a Sunnyside resident, made the announcement via the company’s Facebook page Wednesday. Barthels owns the business with his wife Sylwia.

“It is with a heavy heart that we are announcing that Cooldown Juice’s last day open will be Sunday, July 31st,” the post reads.

“While we have had an amazing experience serving the wonderful people of Sunnyside and Woodside over the past 7+ years, due to rising costs, unfortunately, we must move on.”

Cooldown Juice was first established as a juice delivery service at 39-11 47th Ave. in August 2015. The Barthels then converted their 47th Avenue space a few months later into a small café to offer in-store options as well as delivery.

In 2017 they moved their entire operation to the Skillman Avenue location.

Barthels told the Queens Post that the rising cost of food is the main reason for their impending closure. He said that the cost of their main ingredients—fruit and vegetables—have skyrocketed in recent months.

cooldown juice

Cooldown Juice offers a range of juices made with organic fruit and vegetables, prices of which have skyrocketed in recent months (Photos via Facebook)

Barthels said they considered raising their prices to offset the higher costs, but it was impracticable.

“Even a modest price increase would cause a decrease in customers with people having tighter pockets,” Barthels said, noting the company has seen a slight drop in demand over the last few months.

He said the rising costs have eaten into their bottom line, and the business is no longer economically viable.

Barthels said it was a tough decision to close, given the business had weathered the economic storm of the pandemic.

He said their largest customer before the pandemic was the New York Mets. When restrictions began lifting, new management at the franchise decided not to renew their contract with Cooldown Juice, he said.

Barthels said that when the store closes, he will focus on his day job of teaching students with disabilities. He said his wife will explore new employment opportunities once they close.

“It’s obviously sad, but we’re going to move on to better things so hopefully it’s a blessing in disguise.”

email the author: [email protected]

22 Comments

Click for Comments 
Good luck

Great juices will be missed by Sunnyside runners. Feel bad for Sylvia, a genuinely lovely person who really cared for the business.

Found the owners Facebook troll presence so grating, though. Avoided going in while he was there. Probably cost them a fair bit of business over the years.

5
2
Reply
Gardens Watcher

I would imagine the rent must be unreasonable. If you are selling $10 juice and not making a profit then there’s a problem.

5
1
Reply
Anonymous

I loved their juices, i wish they would had a more inviting decor, it always felt like you were getting something in the back of a room. A bit of design sensibility would had taken this place places. But amazing product. Wishing then owners good luck and prosperity.

20
10
Reply
Joe

Maybe a smoke shop will open up in its place. Seems like hundreds have opened up in Astoria.

11
5
Reply
BR

Very sorry to hear this.
This is what happens when liberal democrats are in power.
All they do is tax and spend.
If this business was in Florida, they would still be in business.

22
47
Reply
RB

Literally says in the article that it is due to raising costs in their core ingredients, fruits and vegetables and a lost contract with a big client. But hey, why read when you can just be a political shill and a moron, right?

43
12
Reply
Gullible Republicans Believe in myths fairytales and conspiracy theories

BR- Did you even read the article? Quote the article “ He said their largest customer before the pandemic was the New York Mets. When restrictions began lifting, new management at the franchise decided not to renew their contract with Cooldown Juice, he said.” They lost a huge account.

28
7
Reply
Florida has a higher murder rate than New York

People moving to Florida from Northern Eastern States is nothing new as proven by attached link. Retiree, people realizing real estate gains in the highly profitable Real Estate markets of the North East, people looking to exploit cheap slave labor and cheap real estate oh and people who can’t afford the North East are the majority of North Easterners moving to Florida.

7
4
Reply
The Mets new management decided not to renew their contract

Their main client dropped them as a client, is the Mets’ GM a tax ‘n spend liberal? 😂

Oops, you accidentally blamed one of the gigantic corporate franchises Republicans give tax breaks to!

17
7
Reply
Critic Al

Do you have a rebuttal? Are you going to let people malign you with their “facts”? Stand up for yourself! Don’t let the facts get in the way!!

Reply
Jozo

There is nothing to do with liberals and democrats at this point !The whole world suffers the economic pandemic crisis .
You might wait for the better time when Trump comes again which you can dream of it but that dream will never come trough!

Reply
lucky number 7 train

That sucks I hope the owners land on their feet. Maybe it’s time to reverse Richard Nixons fiat currency and adhere to the constitution ” weights and measures ” inflation keeps Americans down and is bs.
This is the second time since we left the gold standard that wealth has been stolen from the people ( in a blatantly obvious way not the normal year to year) I’m not necessarily saying gold standard but not fiat.

6
3
Reply
History

Inflation Rate in the United States averaged 3.27 percent from 1914 until 2022, reaching an all time high of 23.70 percent in June of 1920 and a record low of -15.80 percent in June of 1921.

5
3
Reply
A slice of pizza

When I was a kid ( I’m 44) a slice of pizza cost 50 cents. There is core inflation and there is real inflation. ha ha history lesson? stop supporting the banking cartel.

Reply
The real problem

History, your calculation is miss leading. In 1973 we went fiat adding any time before that will lead to a false conclusion. Inflation hurts the poor and middle class especially if you don’t own property a bussiness or equities. We see inflation in what a one bedroom cost in sunnyside 20 years ago or a subway ride or a slice of pizza or a cup of coffee.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Popular places where you can watch the Super Bowl in Queens

Feb. 2, 2023 By Tammy Scileppi

Hey, football fans! Game time is fast approaching, and across the city and here in Queens, you can feel the excitement brewing as the two teams prepare to take the field on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 12. So, kick back and watch the big game, and don’t miss Rihanna’s exciting performance during halftime. 

Borough president hears from community members on budget needs throughout Queens

During a two-day public hearing on the mayor’s 2024 preliminary budget, Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. listened to testimonies from 14 community board representatives, community stakeholders and members of the public on where the money should be spent in Queens. 

The public hearings were held both in-person and via Zoom on Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Queens Borough Hall. The testimonials will be used to develop the Queens Borough Board’s FY24 preliminary budget priorities in the coming weeks. 

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.

LaGuardia Community College receives federal funding to expand vocational training for the unemployed

Jan. 27, 2023 By Bill Parry

LaGuardia Community College recently received more than $400,000 in federal funding to enhance and expand vocational training for underemployed New Yorkers in a city that is still working to recover from COVID-19 pandemic-induced job loss. The support was secured by U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez and former Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney.