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Constantinides Applauds Cuomo Decision to Lift in-Person Requirement for Marriage Licenses

A married couple (Image: Tom the Photographer, Unsplash)

April 20, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

Council Member Costa Constantinides has applauded Governor Andrew Cuomo’s decision to suspend the requirement that couples seeking a marriage license must go to the clerk’s office in person.

Cuomo signed an executive order Saturday that allows couples to access marriage licenses remotely, with clerks able to perform ceremonies over video during the COVID-19 shutdown if need be.

The move follows a request by Constantinides last month to scrap the requirement because couples are being prevented from marrying since the clerk’s office/marriage bureau remains closed as part of the statewide shutdown.

The new order paves the way for couples to be legally married, which will not only cement relationships but also help many people weather the economic crisis. For instance, spouses can access their partner’s healthcare coverage through marriage.

“Nothing should get in the way of love — not even a pandemic,” Constantinides said in a statement.

“There is so much to worry about right now, from fears of contracting coronavirus to struggling to afford rent, that this shouldn’t add to people’s anxiety,” he said.

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