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Community Advisory Group For Upcoming Barnett Avenue Middle School To Hold First Meeting Tonight With City Officials

The building at 38-04 48th St., where a new middle school will be built. (Google Maps)

May 8, 2018 By Nathaly Pesantez

The middle school slated to be built on Barnett Avenue will take yet another leap forward, as a newly-formed community advisory group will meet with city officials tonight for the first time to discuss the project.

The 30-person group, made up of community members and longtime advocates for a middle school at 38-04 48th St., will meet with the School Construction Authority at 6 pm tonight at P.S. 11. The event is limited to those in the committee.

The group’s members were appointed by Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer, and include people like Community Board 2 Chairperson Denise Keehan-Smith and Debra McGowan, the co-founder of the Sunnyside Woodside Middle School Project. Some home owners adjacent to the upcoming school site are also part of the committee.

The formation of a local advisory group to have a say in the middle school’s design and construction was promised by Van Bramer in 2016, following Community Board 2’s vote to approve the middle school at the site after heated discussion from the community.

Van Bramer said in February that the advisory group will allow for “meaningful community input” during the process, and is meant to provide a variety of voices on the project.

McGowan, whose group campaigned for years in support of the middle school, says tonight’s meeting is a “huge, momentous step forward.”

While the meeting signifies a new point in the process, details on what will be discussed tonight remain sparse. The group’s influence on the school’s ultimate design and build out is also unclear.

Still, McGowan predicts that future talking points will center on how to make the middle school work for everyone, including preserving its historical elements, building a sustainable, green building, and the possibility of the community being able to use the building.

“I won’t be relaxed until the doors actually open at the [upcoming] middle school,” McGowan said.

The city’s last significant move toward the project came in January, when it purchased the site for $12.8 million.

The middle school is expected to seat nearly 700 students from grades six to eight in a four to five story building. The school’s design is still in the works, but may include a ground-level playground as well.

The School Construction Authority said in November that the vacant two-story building currently on the lot, built in 1927 as a garage and in use as a pool hall and gym in prior years, will have to be demolished to make way for the school, given its structural issues.

The SCA acknowledged the community’s concerns with preserving the building’s historical elements, and said they would work with the neighborhood to retain some of the original building’s design in the new building.

The community advisory group, however, is one component of the project.The community at large will be able to voice their opinions on the project during Community Board 2 meetings and other upcoming opportunities.

The project’s timeline is also in the works, but could be completed in 2021 if everything falls on schedule, the SCA said in 2016.

Van Bramer and the SCA did not respond to requests for comment on the meeting by press time.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

12 Comments

LIC Neighbor

What a waste of public funds over $12 million for the purchase of the site and probably $100 Million for the building of the school, the owner of the house and other homes that abut that property or in that neighborhood should sell ASAP. The cute little Phipps Playground park that will be reopened will be in full swing for the local teenage thugs which will inundate the gardens and neighborhood. Now all you need on the other side of the Blvd is a homeless shelter, a Phipps low income housing development on the site of Steve Madden or a community Prison. Good that the sheltered gardens will now get their own taste of their JVB medicine.




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George Kelly

Oh yeah people going to hate school it’s going to go crazy all these kids trying to learn gosh knows what will happen. That was the downfall of Detroit and other sad American cities. Too many schools




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Roger

Nothing like hiding from certain public protest an open meeting would bring.




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I am for reaaaal

If you think parking sucks now wait until a school opens! This school needs to stop! Someone please stop this! When there’s a will there’s a way!




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You know

It’s gonna be ugly. The schools they build these days look like prisons. The gardens people are gonna freak when they see kids from woodside houses wandering around the hood! There’s gonna be garbage everywhere, and forget about your flowers and lawns.




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Anonymous

They are really keeping this on the down low. There is still a for sale sign on the building. I am glad that people in Sunnyside are getting their segregated middle school.




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Woodside Mom

The zoning for this middle school will most likely primarily (or totally) consist of students currently enrolled at PS150 and PS11. These primary schools are majority non-white (46-47% Hispanic and 23-38% Asian) so I don’t think the new 700-seat middle school will be segregated. Try learning the facts before you spout off nonsense.




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