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City Relaunches Road Safety Initiative Prompted by the End of Daylight Savings Time

A police officer informing a motorist about the increased dangers of driving during the darker months (Photo: DOT)

Nov. 8, 2021 By Michael Dorgan

The city has relaunched an annual traffic safety initiative to help protect road users during the fall and winter—with the clocks having been pushed back an hour.

The Dusk and Darkness campaign, which aims to remind motorists of the increased dangers of driving over the darker months, was announced by Mayor Bill de Blasio and other city officials Thursday. The campaign places a big emphasis on keeping pedestrians and cyclists safe from collisions with vehicles.

The announcement was made before the clocks were pushed back by one hour Sunday—marking the end of Daylight Savings Time and the beginning of darker evenings.

The campaign, now in its sixth year, urges drivers to be more careful during dusk and evening rush hours since visibility will be reduced. The reduced lighting, officials say, increases the dangers motorists pose to pedestrians and cyclists.

“As the sun sets earlier, drivers have an extra responsibility to slow down,” de Blasio said. “The Dusk and Darkness program combines education and enforcement to make sure they do just that.”

As part of this year’s campaign, police and the Dept. of Transportation have been at high-visibility areas across the city educating drivers about the increased risk of traffic collisions during the morning and evening hours.

Signs and awareness information have been put up by the DOT on bus shelters, LinkNYC kiosks and on print advertising.

Road traffic enforcement has also been ramped up by police in areas where pedestrians and cyclists are most likely to be injured by vehicles. Cops are targeting motorists who speed or fail to yield to pedestrians and cyclists.

The late fall and winter period has historically been the most dangerous time of the year for pedestrians and cyclists, according to DOT data.

Serious collisions involving pedestrians were 40 percent higher – during the late fall and winter period -in the five years before the campaign launched in 2016, according to DOT data.

City officials credited the campaign for a reduction in pedestrian fatalities over the last five years. Pedestrian fatalities were down 18 percent on average during the evening and overnight hours during the months of November through March, according to the data.

The campaign was created as part of the mayor’s Vision Zero initiative which aims to eliminate all traffic fatalities across the five boroughs by 2024.

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Zero vision

Just a load of public relations nonsense.

If the City truly wants to improve traffic safety, start locking up people who kill and maim with their cars.

Also, make the driving test far more vigorous. It’s also not a good idea to give illegal aliens a licence to drive. If they don’t respect our immigration laws, they won’t respect the rules of the road either. It’s foolish to expect them to. (Yes, I know this needs to done at the state level but the City does have influence.)

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Someone should build a border wall or something

Remember when Trump pretended he’d get Mexico to pay for one 😂

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Booboo

Why doesn’t the mayor put any effort into educating cyclists and pedestrians on how to keep themselves safer, too? The activity on the road is coming from many sources now, each source needs to be educated and responsible for their part in keeping everyone safe. Why doesn’t city hall get that idea?

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