You are reading

Biriyani House Shut by Health Dept.

Photo: QueensPost

Nov. 22, 2010 Staff Report

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygeniene closed Biriyani House, the Indian restaurant located at 43-45 43rd Street, on Nov. 16, 2010.

The following report was released by the NYC health department.

 

 

Violations from 11/16/2010 Inspection

Tip! “Critical” violations are displayed in red.

Violation points: 46

Establishment Closed by DOHMH. Violations were cited in the following area(s) and those requiring immediate action were addressed.

Sanitary Violations

1) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

2) Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

3) Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

4) Facility not vermin proof. Harborage or conditions conducive to attracting vermin to the premises and/or allowing vermin to exist.

5) Pesticide use not in accordance with label or applicable laws. Prohibited chemical used/stored. Open bait station used.

6) Plumbing not properly installed or maintained; anti-siphonage or backflow prevention device not provided where required; equipment or floor not properly drained; sewage disposal system in disrepair or not functioning properly.

7) Non-food contact surface improperly constructed. Unacceptable material used. Non-food contact surface or equipment improperly maintained and/or not properly sealed, raised, spaced or movable to allow accessibility for cleaning on all sides, above and underneath the unit.

Note: this site will not report the individual scores asigned to a restaurant by the health dept.  This site will only mention those restaurants that have been closed by the department.

email the author: [email protected]

11 Comments

Click for Comments 
Elizabeth

They forgot:

8) Food is of punishingly bad quality and is about as flavorful as Gerber’s pureed green beans.

Reply
Krissi

There’s much better Indian restaurants in the neighborhood (Basmati Table/Sonali/Greenpoint) so not much of a loss.

Reply
Jodi

I ate there only once years ago and that was the only time I have ever gotten food poisoning. I’m glad it was closed down and hope it gets its act together.

Reply
steven

reply to sunnyside post
I totally agree that you should report this information. Especially when they recieved 46 violation points and 28 is considered critical!

Reply
Sunnyside Post

Steven. I agree. I have eaten at restaurants that have been shut down by the department (and mentioned on this site) afterwards. In fact, one of them I go to quite regularly.
However, as a news site, the situation should be reported.

Reply
steven

I hope they can remedy the violations and reopen as we have eaten there many times for years. I believe that on any given day any restaurant can be heavily cited for violations but what is done to correct the situation speaks volumes for the establishment. There was a time when P J Horgans had multiple violations of the heath and food code but it now proudly displays and “A” rating.

Reply
Jose

Unfortunately, this does not surprise me. They seemed to have no separation between their living quarters and their cooking area.

Reply
sunnysider

this comes as a shock. the place has been around for years. I always would see people eat insde or take out. It shows you never really know what is going on in the kitchen and prep areas. I hope the new restaruant on the corner is not affected by this situation. they have been in our area a short time

Reply
Roger_the_Shrubber

As much as I hate to see a local business close, this place was apparently a public hazard.

Now who is checking the food carts?

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Op-ed: An urgent call for revising NY’s criminal justice reforms to protect public safety

Apr. 11, 2024 By Council Member Robert Holden

In 2019, the State Legislature and Governor Andrew Cuomo embarked on a controversial overhaul of New York’s criminal justice system by enacting several laws, including cashless bail and sweeping changes to discovery laws. Simultaneously, the New York City Council passed laws that compounded these challenges, notably the elimination of punitive segregation in city jails and qualified immunity for police officers. These actions have collectively undermined public safety and constrained law enforcement effectiveness.